Keys to Effective Workouts – Weight Loss, Muscle Gain and Maintenance

 

When you plan to work out, do you actually have a plan? Are you intentional in your choice of exercises? Do you go to the gym and feel confused about what to do? Do you wish you could do a home workout that would be of maximum benefit? There are different forms of exercise and this certainly means that they each have a different effect on our bodies. In this article we will learn about the best exercises for our specific health goals.
Continue reading

Osteoporosis: The Other Silent Killer – A Prescription for Proactivity

The Other Silent Killer
What is Osteoporosis and who is at risk? Osteoporosis is a disease of the skeletal system characterized by low bone mass and deterioration of the bone tissue.
Spinal osteoporosis While the symptoms of the disease seldom become debilitating until the latter stages of life, its propagation may begin much earlier.

Epidemic Proportions

According to statistics from the National Osteoporosis Foundation, 52 million Americans have low bone density or osteoporosis. 50% of women and 25% of men will break a bone after age 50 due to osteoporosis.  Bone Mass and AgeBy 2020, half of Americans over 50 are expected to have low bone density or osteoporosis. A woman’s risk of breaking a hip is equal to her risk of developing breast, uterine and ovarian cancer combined.

Proactive Prevention of Osteoporosis
Bone density peaks around age 30 and subsequently declines. Adolescents and young adults should regularly participate in weight bearing activities in order to build up a “bone density reserve.”
weight lifting
The American College of Sports Medicine,  ACSM, recommends physical activities that generate relatively high-intensity loading forces to augment bone mineral accrual in children and adolescents.  Evidence suggests exercise-induced gains in bone mass in children are maintained into adulthood, suggesting that physical activity habits during childhood may have long-lasting benefits on bone health.

Treatment is Paramount
While Osteoporosis is preventable, it is not curable.  The only option is treatment. Treatment of established osteoporosis is cost-effective irrespective of age (Kanis, et al, 2005). Studies have shown that bone mineral density in postmenopausal women can be maintained or increased with therapeutic exercise.

Basic Bone Anatomy
Bones are made from collagen, calcium-phosphate complexes, and bone cells. Bone tissue is living, and is constantly being remodeled. The underlying cause of osteoporosis is an imbalance between bone resorption and bone formation.osteoporosis bone Excessive bone resorption, inadequate formation of new bone during remodeling, and inadequate peak bone mass are all mechanisms by which osteoporosis develops. Aging results in bone being lost more rapidly than it is formed. 

Weight-bearing and Loading Exercise for Bone Health
Weight bearing activities like walking, jogging, dancing, stair climbing and hiking allow the force of gravity to act through the skeleton. Through this application of force, mechanisms that stimulate bone density are activated in response to the mechanical loading. The training principle of progressive overload is fundamental to the effective treatment of osteoporosis.

Exercise bone growthExercise stimulates effective bone modeling/remodeling.

 
Strength Training for Bone Health
Impact loading exercises are superior to traditional weight-bearing activities for maintaining bone health. Impact loading exercise simply means any exercise that requires you to support your own body weight, including walking, aerobics or weightlifting. Osteoporosis exercises Resistance training can be defined as the act of repeated voluntary muscle contractions against a resistance greater than what is normally experienced in daily life. Training of this kind is known to increase strength through changes in both the muscular and nervous systems. In one study, resistance training had more of an effect on bone strength in the hip and lower spine than walking alone (Harvard Men’s Health Watch, 2013).  Nine months to a year of regular exercise should be afforded before appreciable increases in bone mass are detected.  Proper form and technique are important. Volume, frequency, duration and other training variables should be specific to the condition of the individual. For individuals with diagnosed osteoporosis, the ACSM’s Resource Manual for Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription (Pescatello, et al, 2014) suggests the following guidelines for physical activity and resistance training aimed to prevent falls:

  • One to three sets with five to eight repetitions of four to six weight-bearing, lower-body strength exercises using body weight as resistance
  • Activities performed two to three days/week
  • Additional resistance may be applied gradually and conservatively
    (up to 10 lbs.) with weighted vest
  • Therapy bands & rubber tubing may be used to facilitate
    range-of-motion exercises
  • Avoid impact exercise, spinal flexion against resistance, spinal
    extension, high compressive forces on the spine, quick trunk rotation

Aerobic Training
swim therapy osteoporosisAerobic training is also important to the overall efficiency of the system, and in maintaining bone mass. Aerobic exercises are a system of physical conditioning, such as running, walking, swimming, or calisthenics strenuously performed so as to cause a significant temporary increase in respiration and heart rate. Activities that engage larger muscles like walking, cycling, swimming, and water walking are recommended for overall health, however claims that aerobic exercise can build bone density are false. According to ACSM, “Although aerobic exercises are beneficial and important for overall fitness, they don’t specifically help build bone density”.

Non-Impact Exercises
While non-impact exercises may not directly support bone mass, they still offer immense indirect benefits in the treatment of osteoporosis. Balance exercises (e.g. Tai Chi, aquatic exercises) heighten proprioception and reduce the risk of falling, which is the leading cause of lost independence among the elderly.Tai Chi osteoporosis Postural exercises improve posture and help support the spine. Functional exercises improve the ability to perform activities of daily living, increasing quality of life and maintaining independence. Individuals who practice Tai Chi have 47% less falls and only 25% of the hip fractures of those who do not (Province, et al, 1995).  Tai Chi can be beneficial for stunting bone loss in weight-bearing bones in early postmenopausal women (Chan, et al, 2004).

Dietary Approaches to Fighting Osteoporosis 
Calcium and Vitamin D – Two of the most important nutrients in fighting osteoporosis are calcium and vitamin D. Calcium FoodsCalcium is an important component of the bone matrix, while vitamin D assists in its absorption. Supplementation with vitamin D has improved lower extremity muscle performance and reduced risk of falling in several high-quality double blind randomized control trials (Bischoff-Ferrari, et al, 2009). The Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine of the
National Academies, National Institute of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements recommends the following intake levels for post-menopausal women:

  • Calcium: 1200 milligrams/day
  • Vitamin D: 10 micrograms/day (400 International Units/day) from ages 51 to 70 (Increase to 15 micrograms/day [600 International Units/day] after age 70)

Protein – Aging may compromise the body’s ability to process protein efficiency. Older adults should be vigilant in their consumption of protein in order to avoid protein malnutrition. In one study with elderly men and women, higher dietary protein intake was associated with a lower rate of age-related bone loss (Hannan, et. al, 2000).

______________________________

References
American College of Sports Medicine

Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Dawson-Hughes B, Staehelin HB, et al. (2009) Fall prevention with supplemental and active forms of vitamin D: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Br Med J 339:b3692.

Center for Disease Control. – Calicium

Chan, K; Qin, L; Lau, M; Woo, J; Au, S; Choy, W; Lee, K; Lee, S. A randomized, prospective study of the effects of Tai Chi Chun exercise on bone mineral density in postmenopausal women. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2004;85:717–22.

Daltroy, L. H., Larson MG, Eaton HM, et al. Discrepancies between self-reported and observed physical function in the elderly: the influence of response shift and other factors. Soc Sci Med. 1999;48(11):1549–61. Medline:10400256.

Hannan MT, Tucker KL, Dawson-Hughes B, et al. (2000) Effect of dietary protein on bone loss in elderly men and women: the Framingham Osteoporosis Study. J Bone Miner Res 15:2504.

Hartard M, Haber P, Ilieva D, et al. (1996) Systematic strength training as a model of therapeutic intervention. A controlled trial in postmenopausal women with osteopenia. Am J Phys Med Rehabil 75:21.

Kanis JA, Borgstrom F, Zethraeus N, et al. (2005) Intervention thresholds for osteoporosis in the UK. Bone 36:22

Kemmler W, Lauber D, Weineck J, et al. (2004) Benefits of 2 years of intense exercise on bone density, physical fitness, and blood lipids in early postmenopausal osteopenic women: results of the Erlangen Fitness Osteoporosis Prevention Study  (EFOPS). Arch Intern Med 164:1084.

Kerr, D., Ackland, T., Maslen, B., Morton, A. and Prince, R. (2001), Resistance Training over 2 Years  Increases Bone Mass in Calcium-Replete Postmenopausal Women. J Bone Miner Res, 16: 175–181. doi: 10.1359/jbmr.2001.16.1.175

National Osteoporosis Foundation.

Palombaro, K. M., Black, J. D., Buchbinder, R., & Jette, D. U. (2013). Effectiveness of Exercise for Managing Osteoporosis in Women Postmenopause. Physical Therapy, 93(8), 1021-1025. doi:10.2522/ptj.20110476

Pescatello L, Arena R, Riebe D, Thompson PD, ACSM’s Resource Manual for Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription, American College of Sports Medicine, 9th ed., 2014, Philadelphia : Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Health

Preisinger E, Alacamlioglu Y, Pils K, et al. (1995) Therapeutic exercise in the prevention of bone loss. A controlled trial with women after menopause. Am J Phys Med Rehabil 74:120.

Province MA, Hadley EC, Hornbrook MC, et al. (1995) The effects of exercise on falls in elderly patients. A preplanned meta-analysis of the FICSIT Trials. Frailty and Injuries: Cooperative Studies of Intervention Techniques. JAMA 273:1341.

Raisz, L. (2005). “Pathogenesis of osteoporosis: concepts, conflicts, and prospects”. J Clin Invest 115(12): 3318–25

Strength Training is Better for Bones. (2013). Harvard Men’s Health Watch, 2013 Jul;17(12):8.

_______________________________

Kevin McMahan3This article is written by Kevin McMahan, a Health and Wellness Educator for the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance. Kevin has had a lifelong interest in health and wellness. After graduating from Carmel High School he went on to get an associates degree in social sciences from Monterey Peninsula College, and a bachelors in kinesiology from California State University Monterey Bay. He is a certified personal trainer through the American College of Sports Medicine. “Your health is your wealth”, is something that he always likes to say. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.


Disclaimer:  
The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

Top 30 Yoga Benefits

What are the benefits of yoga? How does the daily discipline of yoga affect the body, mind and spirit?

Yoga Benefits

30 Yoga Benefits

What is the History of Yoga?
Yoga is a holistic health and wellness activity that both relaxes and energizes the body. Yoga is a Sanskrit word meaning “union with God.” The common belief that Yoga derives from Hinduism is a misconception. Yoga actually predates Hinduism by many centuries. Ancient archeological finds discovered the Indus Valley provided unquestionable evidence that Yoga was practiced earlier than 3,000 B.C.E. and the classical techniques of Yoga may date back  to more than 5,000 years. The word Yoga means “to join or yoke together,” and it brings the body and mind together in harmony with one another. The whole system of Yoga is built on three main structures: exercise, breathing, and meditation. One of the earliest texts on Yoga  is believed to have been compiled by a scholar named Patanjali. This book contains Yoga theories and practices and is entitled Yoga Sutras (“Yoga Aphorisms”) and is thought to have been written as early as the 1st or 2nd century B.C. or as late as the 5th century A.D. This system is known as “Ashtanga Yoga.”  This is the eight limbs of Yoga, and referred to today as Classical Yoga. Most all forms of yoga include a variation of Patanjali’s original ancient yoga system.

 

What are the Different Types of Yoga?
There are over a hundred different schools of Yoga. There are many Yoga poses or postures within each of the different schools of Yoga.

Yoga PosesSome of the most well known schools of Yoga are as follows:

  1. Hatha Yoga  Hatha Yoga  is the most widely practiced form of yoga in the United States. It is the branch of yoga which concentrates on physical health and mental well-being using exercises and breathing control.  “Ha” can be translated to mean “sun” and “tha” to mean “moon” meaning to balance the opposite forces.
  2. Raja Yoga – Raja Yoga means the “King” of Yoga, or the royal path. It is a form of Hindu yoga intended to achieve control over the mind and emotions.
  3. Jnana Yoga – Jñāna yoga or “path of knowledge” is one of the types of yoga mentioned in Hindu philosophies. Jñāna is a Sanskrit word translated to mean “knowledge”.
  4. Bhakti Yoga  – Bhakti yoga is a spiritual path described in Hindu philosophy as focused on love of, faith in, and surrender to God. It is a means to awaken to God consciousness. It is a selfless devotion of reaching Brahman (God) in loving service.
  5. Karma Yoga – Karma Yoga is selfless action to reach perfection. “Karma” is a Sanskrit term meaning “action” or deed, either physical or mental. What makes a Karma Yogi is first the experience of union with God, and then selfless action.
  6. Tantra Yoga – Tantra yoga is a type of yoga designed to awaken the kundalini energy in the body and addressing relationships and sexuality. In Hinduism, the word Tantra means: 1) weaving and 2) the sacred scriptures of Hinduism, presented as a dialogue between Shiva and Shakti
  7. Kashmir Shaivism Yoga – Kashmir Shaivism is a transformative non-dual, yogic philosophy that originated in Kashmir in the ninth century. The goal of Kashmir Shaivism is to merge in Shiva or Universal Consciousness, or realize one’s already existing identity with Shiva, by means of wisdom, yoga and grace.

yoga older manWhat Does Research Tell Us About the Effectiveness of Yoga?
Sudarshan Kriya Yoga was concluded to be a potentially effective treatment in reducing or eliminating depression in a study by Janakiramaiah N and others (2000) and a review of clinical studies of the effectiveness of Hatha Yoga on depression by Uebelacker et al  (2010).

The prac­tice of yoga has been shown to be therapeutically useful in bron­chial asthmaNagarathna R, Nagendra HR (1985) concluded that “There was a significantly greater improvement in the group who practised yoga in the weekly number of attacks of asthma, scores for drug treatment, and peak flow rate.”  However, a 2011 systematic review of clinical studies suggests that there is no sound evidence that yoga improves asthma.

back pain personMultiple studies  have found yoga to be a helpful treatment in low back pain such as Sherman KJ, Cherkin DC, Wellman RD, et al (2011) and Tilbrook HE, Cox H, Hewitt CE, et al. (2011).   Other studies have shown yoga to be potentially helpful treatment for cardiovascular disease, such as Raub (2002), type II diabetes mellitus (Innes and Vincent, 2007),  stress and hypertension (Kiecolt-Glaser JK, and others, 2010) as well as other conditions. The practice of yoga can also play a role in the rehabilitation of those who have physical and mental challenges (Uma, et al, 2008).  Many other benefits are inherit in the practice of yoga as described below.

What Are the 30 Benefits of Yoga?

  1. Relieves Stress
  2. Improves Breathing
  3. Eases Pain
  4. Improves Circulation
  5. Increases Strength
  6. Increases Endurance
  7. Lowers Heart Rate
  8. Develops Inner Peace
  9. Lengthens Muscles
  10. Increases Flexibilityyoga mats
  11. Reduces Cortisol Level
  12. Improves Concentration
  13. Increases Range of Motion
  14. Dissolves Ego
  15. Develops Compassion
  16. Enhances Energy
  17. Heals Ailments
  18. Fosters Joy
  19. Lowers Weight
  20. Lubricates Joints
  21. Detoxes the Body
    yoga man
  22. Strengthens Abdomen
  23. Improves Memory
  24. Delays Wrinkles and Aging
  25. Burns Fat
  26. Improves Posture
  27. Improves Metabolism
  28. Builds Immune System
  29. Improves Balance
  30. Brings Harmony

Have you tried yoga? If so, how has it helped YOU?  Best wishes for a yoga-riffic day!!

 _______________________________

References
Bower JE, Woolery A, Sternlieb B, et al. Yoga for cancer patients and survivors. Cancer Control. 2005;12(3):165–171.

Innes, KE, Vincent HK, The Influence of Yoga-Based Programs on Risk Profiles in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review, Evid Based Complement Alternat Med., Dec 2007; 4(4): 469–486.
Jain SC, Talukdar B. Bronchial asthma and Yoga. Singapore Med J 1993;34:306-308

Janakiramaiah N. , Gangadhar B.N. , Naga Venkatesha Murthy P.J. , Harish M.G., Subbakrishna, D.K., Vedamurthachar A.  Antidepressant efficacy of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY) in melancholia: a randomized comparison with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and imipramine Volume 57, Issue 1 , Pages 255-259, January 2000

Kiecolt-Glaser JK, Christian L, Preston H, et al. Stress, inflammation, and yoga practice. Psychosomatic Medicine. 2010;72(2):113–121.

Monro R, Power J, Coumar A, Nagarathna R, Dandona P. Original research yoga therapy for NIDDM; A controlled trial. Complem Med J 1992;6:66-68.

Nagarathna R, Nagendra HR. Yoga for bronchial asthma; A controlled study. Br Med J 1985;291:1077-1079.

Ramesh L. Bijlani, Rama P. Vempati, Raj K. Yadav, Rooma Basu Ray, Vani Gupta, Ratna Sharma, Nalin Mehta, and Sushil C. Mahapatra.  A Brief but Comprehensive Lifestyle Education Program Based on Yoga Reduces Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Mellitus The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. April 2005, 11(2): 267-274. doi:10.1089/acm.2005.11.267.

Raub, JA. Psychophysiologic effects of hatha yoga on musculoskeletal and cardiopulmonary function: a literature review. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 2002;8(6):797–812.

Sherman KJ, Cherkin DC, Wellman RD, et al. A randomized trial comparing yoga, stretching, and a self-care book for chronic low back pain. Archives of Internal Medicine. 2011;171(22):2019–2026.

Telles S, Naveen K V. Yoga for rehabilitation : An overview, Vivekananda Kendra Yoga Research Foundation, No. 19, K.G. Nagar, Bangalore-560 019., India,  Indian J Med Sci 1997;51:123-7Monro R, Power J, Coumar A, Nagarathna R, Dandona P. Original research yoga therapy for NIDDM; A controlled trial. Complem Med J 1992;6:66-68.

Tilbrook HE, Cox H, Hewitt CE, et al. Yoga for chronic low back pain: a randomized trial. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2011;155(9):569–578.

Uebelacker LA, Epstein-Lubow G, Gaudiano BA, et al. Hatha yoga for depression: a critical review of the evidence for efficacy, plausible mechanisms of action, and directions for future research. Journal of Psychiatric Practice. 2010; 16(1):22–33.

Uma K, Nagendra HR, Nagarathna R., Vaidehi S, and Seethalakshmi R., The integrated approach of yoga: a therapeutic tool for mentally retarded children: a one-year controlled study, Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, Vol 33, Issue 5, 28 JUN 2008, DOI: 10.1111/ j.1365-2788.1989.tb01496


_________________________________

Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice Dart, M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University. Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.” She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.

Disclaimer:
The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

Diabetes and Cancer: Is There a Connection?

 

What are Diabetes Symptoms?

What are Diabetes Symptoms?

What are the  Common Symptoms of Diabetes and Cancer?

The most common symptoms of diabetes are fatigue, excessive thirst and appetite, blurred vision, slow healing sores, dry mouth, unusual weight loss or weight gain, nausea and perhaps vomiting, yeast infections, itching in the groin or vagina and increased urination.  Both cancer and diabetes share symptoms of obesity, lack of physical activity, hyperinsulinemia, inflammation and poor diet. 

Cancer and Diabetes


Is There a Connection Between Diabetes and Cancer?
Diabetes and cancer both share the same risk factors. Researchers are trying to learn more about the link between type 2 diabetes and certain cancers (liver, pancreas, uterus, breast, colon and bladder).  Common risk factors for diabetes and cancer  include: 1) age, 2) gender, 3) race/ethnicity, 4) overweight, 5) smoking, 6) alcohol, 7) inactivity.


Cancer Diabetes Chart


Could the Connection be Caused by the Diabetes Medication?

It is possible that the connection between cancer and diabetes is due to the diabetes medication, however more evidence is needed. Research shows that the implication of  a cancer link to the medication is “less persuasive”  however, it is important that research be conducted to rule out this as a contributing factor.  In a consensus Statement by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Endocrinology, entitled, “Diabetes and Cancer – An AAE/ACE Consensus Statement,”  Handelsman, Y., LeRoith, D., Bloomgarden, Z., and others concluded:

 

Diabetes Medication
“Epidemiology demonstrated a significant increase of cancer in obesity, insulin-resistant states (i.e., metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome), and ultimately diabetes.

Basic science has suggested plausible mechanisms linking these conditions to the development of cancer. Although medications to treat the hyperglycemia of diabetes have been implicated in increasing the risk of cancer, the totality of evidence is less persuasive, and there is a need for current vigilance and future research.”

 

Cancer and Diabetes Risks

Is There a Connecting Link with Obesity, Diabetes and Cancer?
Yes. The American Association of Cinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Endocrinology stated in there consensus statement, “Diabetes and Cancer,” that it is most likely that obesity is the strongest link between cancer and diabetes.  Research shows that reducing caloric intake lowers the risk of cancer, and therefore, obesity in diabetics can increase the cancer risk.   Handelsman, Y., LeRoith, D., Bloomgarden, Z., and others stated:

“After examining the relative contributions of obesity, insulin, IGF’s and diabetes to cancer development, it would appear that the most compelling scenario for cancer development may include a combination of prolonged obesity due to excess caloric intake plus the resulting increase of circulating insulin, IGF’s cytokines and inflammatory molecules. Compelling research in animals has shown that caloric restriction (>10 to 40% of daily intake) can prevent cancer development with diminished levels of IGF-1 believed to play a central role in mediating this effect.”


Diabetes and CancerWhat to Do to Reduce Risk of Diabetes or Cancer

  • Eat Healthy Foods – The recommended diet for cancer prevention and diabetes prevention and maintenance is the same. A diabetes diet — medically known as medical nutrition therapy (MNT) for diabetes, is basically a diet consisting of a variety of nutritious foods in moderate amounts and eaten at regular mealtimes.
  • Keep Weight Down – Studies show that increased weight gain and obesity lead to problems with diabetics and increased risk of cancer. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers health benefits.According to the American Cancer Society, one out of every three cancer deaths in the United States is linked to excess body weight, poor nutrition, and/or physical inactivity. Body weight appears to have the strongest evidence linking it to cancer. The American Cancer Society  reports that obesity contributes to as many as 1 out of 5 of all cancer-related deaths.

Type 2 Diabetes

  • Exercise and Keep Active –  Exercise several times a day. If you have a sedentary job (one that keeps you sitting for most of the day), take breaks every two hours and do light stretching exercises). Research confirms that inactivity leads to diabetes and cancer.

    The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) is a nationally representative survey of the U.S. population. From 2000 to 2002, detailed social, demographic, and medical information was collected for 68,500 adults. The researchers concluded that “both physical inactivity and obesity seem to be strongly and independently associated with diabetes and diabetes-related diseases cormorbidities.”  Scientists have shown that low levels of physical activity can increase the risk of certain cancers (bowel cancer, breast cancer, womb cancer, and others). A December 2011 study estimated that in about 1% of cancers in the United Kingdom, more than 3,000 cases every year are linked to people doing less than government suggested guidelines for weekly physical exercises and activities.

  • Do not smoke cigarettes or other carcinogenic materials.  If you are already smoking, stop. If you haven’t started smoking, don’t begin.  Multiple studies confirm the increased risk of cancer in those who smoke.  However, is the same risk true for diabetes? Research confirms that smoking can cause the development of Type 2 diabetes. According to  research from the American Heart Association, about 22% of adults with diabetes smoke, even though U.S. research indicates that the most harmful effect of smoking is linked to a significantly higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.The University of Lausanne in Switzerland, studied more than one million patients and found that smoking creates a 44% higher chance of developing Type 2 diabetes compared with non-smokers, and that the risk increases with the average number of cigarettes smoked daily.

Studies show that diabetes and cancer share the same risk factors. More research is needed to determine if there is a link between the two.

RESOURCES

_________________________________  

Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice Dart,  M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University.  Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.”  She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance.  The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3  nonprofit health and wellness education organization.  For more information about  the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.

Disclaimer:  The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

 

Top 20 Tips for Healthy Skin

Is there anything that can help diminish wrinkles and aging? What can be done to keep the skin youthful-looking and healthy? Here are the top twenty holistic health natural tips for radiant, glowing skin.

20 tips for Healthier Younger Looking Skin

Looking for younger-looking skin? Try these 20 top tips!

  1. Don’t smoke
    The more cigarettes you smoke and the longer you smoke, the more skin wrinkling you’re likely to have.  This is because the nicotine in cigarettes causes narrowing of the blood vessels in the outer layers of the skin and impairs blood flow. The result is that the skin doesn’t get as much oxygen and important nutrients, such as vitamin A. 
  2. Don’t drink alcohol
    Alcohol can make you age faster and cause more wrinkles. Drinking alcohol can cause premature wrinkles, dehydration, loss of elasticity, loss of collagen, redness, and puffiness of the skin.
  3. Get plenty of sleep
    When a person doesn’t get enough sleep this causes the skin to sag, bags under the eyes, and a lack of luster and radiance.  Lack of sleep causes blood vessels to dilate, creating the appearance of dark circles under the eyes.  A person who gets plenty of sleep is less stressed.  Getting plenty of sleep at night helps to keep the skin healthy and glowing.
  4. Avoid sun during the peak times
    As the sun moves higher in the sky, the sun’s rays become more intense.  This means more potential damage to the skin and eyes. The ultraviolet (UV) light travels a shorter, more direct distance to reach the earth during the peak sun intensity hours when UV light is the strongest,.  This is between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. standard time or 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. daylight savings time.
  5. Use broad spectrum sunscreen with both UVA and UVB protection.
    Ultraviolet rays are grouped into three different categories: UVA, UVB and UVC.  The SPF, “sun protection factor”, is only a measure of protection against UVB rays which burn the skin, but SPF is not a measure of UVA rays which penetrate deep into the skin, suppress the immune system and may cause cancer.  This is why it is important to look on your sunscreen for “broad spectrum” protection of both UVA and UVB protection
  6. Wear protective clothing
    The primary cause of aging and skin damage is damage from the sun. If you are planning on being outside for many hours, wear long sleeved shirts, hats, long pants and sun glasses, to protect yourself from the sun’s damaging rays.
  7. Get eyes checked regularly to eliminate wrinkles from squinting
    Many people avoid a trip to the optometrist when having trouble seeing.  Long term effects of squinting the eyes in order to better focus or  squinting the eyes because of the brightness of the sun, can cause wrinkled skin on the face and “crows feet” around the eyes.  Always wear sunglasses and keep your prescriptions up to date.
  8. Clean skin thoroughly daily
    Boil water in a pot or tea kettle, pour the water into a bowl, then put a towel over your head and hold the bowl near your face for about 5-10 minutes. Then wash your face thoroughly with a cleanser that is appropriate for your skin type. Pat dry with a clean cloth.
  9. Use moisturizer if skin is dry
    Not everyone needs to use moisturizer.  When purchasing moisturizers, check to make sure that it is appropriate for your skin type (oily, dry, normal).  Always make sure your hands are clean before applying creams, lotions, shaving cream, makeup, etc., to prevent bacterial infections.
  10. Always remove makeup before sleeping
    Many people state that they are too tired to properly remove makeup, lotions or shaving lotions before going to sleep.  Leaving makeup or other skin lotions and applications on overnight, can cause the skin to produce acne from build up of dirt and oil in the pores of the skin.  Use warm water to clean the skin with a cleanser appropriate for your skin type.
  11. Always rinse well to remove dead skin and soap
    After thoroughly cleaning the skin, it is important to rinse several times to be sure to remove soap. Do a final rinse with cool (not cold) water to close pores.
  12. Use water-based products
    Water-based water-based moisturizers have a light, nongreasy feeling. They are appropriate for most everyone, including people with allergies, sensitive skin, oily skin, and normal skin.  For very dry, cracked skin, it might be more appropriate to choose a heavier, oil-based moisturizer that contains ingredients such as antioxidants, grape seed oil to help keep the skin hydrated. or to consult with a doctor or skin specialist for the appropriate moisturizing products.
  13. Eat organic, non-GMO foods
    Eating healthy, natural  foods that do not contain toxic chemicals such as pesticides and added chemicals help to bring a healthy, natural glow to the skin and help the body release toxins through the skin.
  14. Eliminate trans fats and added sugars
    Trans fats and high fructose corn syrup—are in 40 percent of the foods Americans eat every day.  Multiple studies have shown that these foods contribute to obesity, diabetes and heart disease, bringing stress and ill-health to the body. Keeping the body healthy and in tip top shape adds to the health of the skin, because the skin is a major toxin removing system and when it is overworked, it cannot be in the best condition.  Taking care of the skin begins with what you eat.
  15. Exercise regularly
    Studies show that regular exercise helps the body have healthier, younger-looking skin. Consult with your fitness coach, health practitioner, or physical therapist to design a physical fitness program that is safe and appropriate for you. Set aside time each day to devote to your exercise routine.
  16. Shave with a sharp, clean razor
    Nearly 5 million bacteria have been found on a single disposable wet razor handle in new laboratory research by antibacterial technology specialist Microban Europe.  Clean the razor blade with alcohol daily before using, and thoroughly clean the skin after shaving.
  17. Dispose of old makeup and applicators every 6-12 months.
    Cosmetic manufacturers are not required by law to put expiration dates on their products. This leaves the responsibility of caring for the skin up to the consumer.  Check makeup and lotions regularly for consistency (has it become thicker?), color (has the color become darker?), and smell (does it have a strange odor?).  Makeup that is used around the eyes is more prone to bacteria and should probably be replaced every 3-6 months. Other products could be replaced every 6 months to one year.Do facial exercises regularly
  18. Do facial exercises regularly
    You might be disciplined about working out on the treadmill but are you doing your face and eye exercises? If you spend long days in front of computer with a furrowed brow, it’s important to take breaks every few hours to stretch the muscles in the face and neck. This helps to maintain elasticity and prevent sagging skin, toning the face and eliminating wrinkles.
  19. Drink plenty of water
    The most effective treatment for healthy skin is hydration. Drink plenty of water to help the body remove toxins.
  20. Meditate or practice relaxation techniques
    Eliminating stress improves the condition of the skin.  This is because stress causes your body to produce cortisol and other hormones, which causes the sebaceous glands to produce more oil. Oily skin is more prone to acne and other skin problems.  Take a warm relaxing bath, do something you love, read a book, try deep breathing, yoga, meditation, listen to music, watch a funny movie, or talk to a friend or counselor.

24 Health Benefits of Spinach

Benefits SpinachWhy should someone eat spinach?
Can it be dangerous to eat too much spinach? Does spinach aid in healing?

Spinach has been shown to be effective in improving health for a variety of reasons. Spinach is high in fiber. One cup of spinach has nearly 20% of the RDA of dietary fiber.  A diet that is high in fiber helps aid digestion, prevents constipation, maintains low blood sugar, and prevents people from overeating.

Research has shown that flavonoids– a phytonutrient  have anti-cancer properties.  Spinach is abundant in flavanoids.  Flavanoids can slow down cell division in human stomach and skin cancer cells.  Research has shown that flavanoids provide protection against the occurrence of aggressive prostate cancer.

Blood PressureSpinach can help lower blood pressure  by inhibiting the angiotensin I-converting enzyme, peptides. Folate in spinach is good for a healthy cardiovascular system. Magnesium in spinach is a mineral that helps to lower high blood pressure.

Lutein is a carotenoid found in spinach that is protective against eye diseases. There is some indication lutein might be absorbed better if you eat it with a little fat. Both antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin are especially plentiful in spinach and protect the eye from cataracts and age-related macular degeneration.

Spinach is good for our skin.  It containshigh amounts of vitamin A. Vitamin A promotes healthy skin by allowing for proper moisture retention in the epidermis. Eating spinach can help in fighting psoriasis, keratinization, acne and help to prevent early onset of wrinkles. Spinach is also a good source of selenium, niacin, and omega-3 fatty acids. Spinach promotes healthy brain and nervous system.

Arthritis Knee DiagramArthritis
sufferers will be glad to know that spinach can help reduce inflammation and pain.  Neoxanthin and violaxanthin are two anti-inflammatory epoxyxanthophylls that are found in spinach. These play an important role in controlling inflammation.

Spinach is high in vitamins and nutrients.  The vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, manganese, zinc and selenium present in spinach all serve as powerful antioxidants that combat the onset of osteoporosis, atherosclerosis and high blood pressure. Spinach is also an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin A, magnesium, folate, manganese, iron, calcium, vitamin C, vitamin B2, potassium, and vitamin B6. It’s a very good source of protein, phosphorus, vitamin E, zinc, dietary fiber, and copper.

Myelin SheathThe abundance of vitamin K in spinach helps to  provide an essential part for the synthesis of sphingolipids. Sphingolipids are the crucial fat that make up the Myelin sheath around our nerves.   Vitamin K is also an important part of the process of carboxylation.  Carboxylation produces the matrix Gla protein that prevents calcium from forming in our body tissues. Eating one cup of spinach contributes to this process that fights atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke.

The vitamin A in spinach can help us fight infection.  One cup of spinach contains over 337% of the RDA of vitamin A.  Vitamin A protects and strengthens mucous membranes, respiratory, urinary and intestinal tracts.  Vitamin A also is a key component of lymphocytes (or white blood cells) that fight infection.

OsteoporosisSpinach can be very helpful in preventing osteoporosis.  If spinach is boiled, one cup provides over 1000% of the RDA of vitamin K that can prevent excess activation of osteoclasts.  Osteoclasts are the cells that break down bones.   Spinach can also increase the synthesis of osteocalcin.  Osteocalcin is the protein that is essential for maintaining the bone density and strength.


Are there any reasons why someone should not eat spinach?
  • Some people are allergic to spinach.  If you have not eaten it before, eat a small amount to see if you are allergic to it.
  • Spinach can be a high pesticide-containing food, so it’s important to always wash spinach and eat organic spinach.
  • The oxalates in spinach may interfere with the absorption of calcium, and could crystallize. People who have kidney or gallbladder problems may want to think carefully about choosing to eat spinach.
  • People with thyroid problems should consult their doctor about eating spinach. It’s possible that it can interfere with proper thyroid gland functioning.  However, many people with thyroid problems choose to cook spinach. Cooking spinach can reduce the goitrogenic compounds.
  • Spinach contains purines.  Gout-prone people might choose not to eat spinach because they may be affected by the purines in this food.
Benefits of Spinach
What are the 24 Benefits of Spinach?
  1. Low in calories
  2. High in vitamin A
  3. High in vitamin K
  4. High in magnesium
  5. High in fiber
  6. Protein source
  7. Calcium source
  8. Antioxidant source
  9. Cancer preventative
  10. Lowers blood pressure
  11. Lowers cholesterol
  12. High folate level
  13. Increases brain function
  14. Anti-inflammatory
  15. Promotes healthy vision
  16. Increases circulation
  17. Helps immune system
  18. Helps fight infection
  19. Promotes healthy skin
  20. High in flavanoids
  21. Vitamin E source
  22. Beta-carotene source
  23. Zinc source
  24. Increases bone density

_________________________________

Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice Dart, M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University. Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.” She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.

 

Disclaimer:  The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition. 

 

Farewell, Candy, Cookies, and Cheese Puffs! 2014 Federal School Snack Restrictions

FEDERAL RESTRICTION ON SCHOOL SNACKS
What snack foods can children eat at school?  The Agriculture Department has announced Thursday, June 27, 2013, that there will be restrictions on what types of snacks schools can sell. Students will no longer be able to fill up on trans fats that are found in greasy pizzas, high-fat chips and snacks, and sugars found in ice cream treats, cookies, juice drinks, high-calorie sodas, snack cakes and sports drinks, and salty pretzels or chips.

School Snack Restrictions

The federal government announced school snack restrictions on June 27, 2013 for the 2014-15 school year.

The governments new standards for healthier snack  foods in schools would apply to all the “a la carte” lines in the school cafeterias, vending machines, snack bars or any other food sold at school and on the school campus grounds.  It would not apply to fundraisers, after school  class parties or foods brought from home to the school.

WHICH SNACKS ARE ACCEPTABLE AND WHICH ARE NOT?
According to the federal guidelines, acceptable snack items include:

  1. Baked potato chips
  2. Granola bars
  3. Cereal bars
  4. Trail mix
  5. Dried fruits
  6. Fruit cups
  7. Yogurt
  8. Sugarless gum
  9. Whole grain-rich muffins
  10. 100 percent fruit juice drinks
  11. Diet soda (high schools)
  12. Flavored water (high schools)
  13. Diet sports drinks (high schools)
  14. Unsweetened or diet iced teas (high schools)
  15. Baked lower-fat french fries
  16. Healthier pizzas with whole grain crust
  17. Lean hamburgers with whole wheat buns

Snack food that are not acceptable include:

  1. Candy
  2. Snack cakes
  3. Most cookies
  4. Pretzels
  5. High-calorie sodas
  6. High-calorie sports drinks
  7. Juice drinks that are not 100 % juice
  8. Most ice cream and ice cream treats
  9. High-fat chips and snacks
  10. Greasy pizza
  11. Deep-fried, high-fat foods

WHEN DOES THIS TAKE EFFECT?
The federal snack rules will take effect during the 2014-2015 school year, but schools can start earlier to put these restrictions into effect. Many schools already have been making improvements. Thirty-nine states have a snack food policy.

In 2010 Congress passed the law championed by first lady Michelle Obama as a part of her efforts to stop childhood obesity, requiring the Agriculture Department to make changes in the rules describing acceptable school offered snacks. Several companies in the food industry worked with Congress three years ago on the child nutrition law.

ARE THERE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN HIGH SCHOOL AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SNACKS?
Differences exist between high school and elementary or middle school regulations on appropriate snacks.  Low-calorie sports drinks such as Gatorade’s G2, and diet drinks will be allowed in high school.  However, elementary and middle schools will only be permitted to sell water, carbonated water, 100 percent fruit juice, 100 percent vegetable juice,  nonfat flavored milk, and low fat and fat-free milk.

30 Ways to Lose Weight Fast and Permanently

How can you lose weight fast and keep it off?  The majority of people in the United States are overweight, but how do you eat healthy, stay physically fit, and lose weight permanently? There are plenty of weight-loss diets out there, but what really works?

30 Ways to Lose Weight and Keep it Off

How do you lose weight? Everybody knows losing weight means cutting and burning calories, but here are 30 lifestyle changes to keep it off.

Everyone knows that the secret is cutting calories and burning calories but it also takes a change of lifestyle.  Losing weight and staying fit is not something that you can accomplish  sitting in front of the TV eating popcorn every night, but you can be successful if you are determined, disciplined and follow a plan to achieve your goal. Here are 30 great tips for changing your routine, in order to lose weight and keep it off permanently.

Exercise Pushup

Every weight-loss program should include physical fitness. Find a way to engage in physical fitness that is fun for you!

  1. Exercise 30 to 60 minutes every day, or if you are on a tight schedule, exercise several times during the day — for example, three 10-minute exercise sessions.
  2. Eat small meals often. Rather than eating one large meal and skipping meals, eat three healthy meals during the day, especially breakfast. Studies show that skipping meals causes can lead to overeating or snacking unhealthy foods later in the day.
  3. Eat fruits and vegetables. If your main entree is grilled, skinless chicken, and make the fruits and vegetables the largest portions on your plate and cut down on other foods.
  4. Weigh yourself every day. If you are conscious of your weight and the progress you are making, you are more likely to be successful.

    Writing

    Keep track of what you eat and how much exercise you are doing and soon you will be aware of the cause of  weight loss or weight gain.

  5. Keep a journal, or food diary with you at all times.  Purchase a small notebook that is easy to carry in a suit pocket or purse. Practice being conscious of what you eat and recognizing particular situations or times of day when you are more likely to eat unhealthy foods. A food diary can help you make life changes.
  6. Remove unhealthy snacks from the house. This would include all fried foods, packaged snack items such as chips, pretzels, greasy pizza, buttery popcorn, etc, and sugary treats such as sugary sodas, candy bars, snack cakes, caramel corn, cookies, and ice creams or frozen treats. These foods are high in trans fats and have been found to trigger and increase the risk of many health problems and diseases.
  7. Store healthy snacks. After removing all unhealthy snacks from your home, be sure to fill your cupboard and refrigerator with healthy snacks.  The best snacks are organic fruits, vegetables, whole grain crackers, 100% juices, low-fat dairy products such as low-fat yogurt.
  8. Keep active with friends or family members, and plan physical activities together.  Have a physical fitness buddy to go bike riding with, play soccer, tennis, go to the gym, go dancing, etc. Choose activities several days a week that keep you moving rather than video-games or or movies.

    Cooking at home

    Cooking food at home is fun, helps to burn calories (rather than sitting around at a restaurant) and lessens the chance of making unwise choices. Be sure to have healthy foods in your refrigerator and eliminate packaged, high-fat or trans fat foods.

  9. Eat at home often rather than eating out at restaurants or fast food chains. When you eat at home you can control what food is available and eliminate unhealthy choices. Many restaurants typically provide more food than needed. If you have to eat at a restaurant, decide how much food you will eat and ask for a take-home box before eating. Box up the extra portions of food before eating your portion.
  10. Don’t use serving bowls. When preparing your food, put it on the plate instead of putting serving bowls on the table. Always serve yourself a little bit less than what you expect to eat. Bring the prepared plate to the table. Put away extra food that is left in the pot or pan before sitting down at the table.
  11. Fill up healthy. Always fill up on healthy foods throughout the day that are low in calories, such as celery, or fruit, so that when you are invited to eat a dessert or snack you won’t be as tempted or hungry.
  12. Make active choices to accomplish everyday chores.  Instead of going through a drive-through pharmacy to pick up your prescriptions, walk inside the store. Use a bike to visit a friend, instead of a car. Get down on your hands and knees and pull the weeds or scrub the floor, instead of using garden extension tools or a long-handled easy-clean mop. Walk the dog regularly.
  13. Never eat in front of TV.  Television viewing strongly affects how much and what people eat. People tend to continue to eat while watching.
  14. Vary your activities regularly in order to avoid exercise burnout. Walk, swim, dance, and engage in sports.
  15. Never eat from containers such as an ice cream carton, a Tupperware container, a package of cookies, or a bag of chips.  Instead, put the portion on your plate, and then put the container of food away. When you can see how much you’ve eaten on your plate you are less likely to eat more.
  16. De-stress before eating.  Engage in relaxation techniques before eating because stress causes people to eat more. Praying or saying grace before eating is not unwise. It helps to relax, surrender and let go of worries and eliminate stress. Other options are deep breathing exercises, meditation, stretching exercises, reading something amusing or humorous,  listening to relaxing music, and even chatting with friends and family about uplifting or inspirational thoughts or experiences.

    High fiber foods

    Starting the day with high fiber foods helps to reduce weight. What is high fiber? Fruits, vegetables, and whole grains such as oatmeal.

  17. Start with high-fiber or bran foods, such as oatmeal or high-fiber breads or bran cereals.  Studies show that people that start the morning with a high-fiber diet are less likely to gain weight.
  18. Buy a pedometer and add an extra 2,000 steps a day. On average, sedentary people take only 2,000 to 3,000 steps a day.
  19. Walk 30-minutes a day. Walk to the store, walk down the street and give a basket of fruit to a neighbor. Walk the dog. Studies show that those who regularly engage in walking are more healthy and physically fit.
  20. Plan a week’s groceries. To prevent impulse buying, always plan a week ahead and make a detailed grocery list.  Never go grocery shopping when you are hungry and have skipped a meal.  Last-minute trips to the grocery store can result in buying snack foods or tempting foods on display in the bakery, snack aisle, or deli section, that are not on your healthy foods list.
  21. Have a craving plan. If you feel hungry and are feeling a craving for an unhealthy food, then do something active.  Drink a full glass of water, call a friend, write in your journal, paint a picture, clean the house, engage in sports, read a book, or do something that does not trigger thoughts of eating. Keeping your mind and body active will help to eliminate cravings.
  22. Reward yourself. If you have lost weight, reward yourself with nonfood rewards, such as going on that vacation you’ve dreamed of, buying new clothes, getting a new haircut or purchasing something for your home. Spend time listening to your heart and finding out how to truly love yourself.
  23. Find an on-line buddy. Studies show that online weight-loss partnering results in more successfully achieving weight-loss goals.

    Couple wearing blue

    Studies on the effects of color and color therapy show that blue can be an appetite suppressant whereas red tends to increases the appetite.

  24. Choose blue.  Wear the color blue more often and decorate your home with it. The color blue is an appetite suppressant, whereas the colors red, yellow, and orange have been found to increase the appetite.
  25. Use small plates. Get rid of large dinner plates and buy small plates. You are more likely to pile on the food if your plates are over-sized.
  26. Throw out large clothes. When you have lost weight, give away or throw out clothes that are too large for you. Keep only the clothes that fit or are “snug” on you. If you always keep large, over-sized clothes you will be less likely to lose weight.
  27. Use a mirror. If you eat in a dining room area, keep a mirror hanging on the wall opposite where you sit.  If you watch yourself in the mirror while eating, you are less likely to overeat.
  28. Read labels. When buying foods in the grocery store, read the labels.  Do not buy foods that are high in trans fats or are high in cholesterol, salt, or sugar.  Do not buy foods that have added corn syrup, food coloring, or food additives.
  29. Season smartly. Use salsa to season foods or spices such as curry, turmeric, pepper, basil, etc., instead of heavy, high-fat sauces such as gravy or butter.
  30. Increase calcium. Calcium in low-fat dairy foods triggers a hormonal response that inhibits the body’s production of fat cells and breaks down fat.

RESOURCES

 

 


_________________________________

 

Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice Dart, M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University. Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.” She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.

Disclaimer:  The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

 

 

 

Teens Not Physically Fit – New Study Reveals

Are our teens getting enough exercise? Do they eat a healthy diet?

WHAT DOES RESEARCH SAY?
A recent research study from the National Institute of Health shows that only 50%, nearly half, of all adolescents in the United States are participating in physical activities five or more days a week and only one out of every four adolescents eat fruits and vegetables every day.

 

Adolescent Health Fitness.jpg

A study from the National Institute of Health showed teenagers engage in limited physical activity and a diet lacking in fruits and vegetables. Click, copy, download, save and share.

WHO AND WHAT WAS SURVEYED?
The survey studied 10,000 students from 39 different states ranging from eleven to sixteen years of age.  Students were questioned about their daily physical activity, the amount of time that they spent using a computer or watched television, their emotional and psychological health,  and their diet and nutritional habits.  Researchers determined if their was a correlation between emotional health and physical activity.

 

WHAT WERE THE FINDINGS OF THE SURVEY?
Researchers determined that only one in every four adolescents (25%)  were demonstrating healthy patterns of high physical activity combined with eating lots of fruits and vegetables and lower intake of snack foods. Those who were exhibiting healthy life-style patterns also were more healthy emotionally and psychologically.

Nearly half, 47% of the teenagers were engaging in a small amount of physical activity and consumed a diet lacking in fruits and vegetables.

Dr. Ann M. Davis, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Kansas Medical Center said that teenagers today are “extremely sedentary and they have terrible diets for a variety of reasons.”

“Unhealthful” students comprised about 26% of those surveyed, and tended to spend most of their time in front of the computer, eating more sugary snacks and less fruits and vegetables than others, and were most likely to be underweight and have symptoms of depression.  Early unhealthy lifestyles can lead to heart disease, depression, high cholesterol, obesity and other serious health problems later in life.

Of the 27% who were determined to be “healthful students,” nearly 65% reported exercising more than five days a week, and least likely to spend significant time in front of computer screens or to eat sweets, soft drinks and packaged snack foods that are high in trans fats.

 

WHAT CAN BE DONE?
Children naturally like to move and be physically involved. Parents can help by turning off the television, limiting computer access, or arranging for and scheduling physical activities such as swimming, tennis, basketball, dance, etc.  Parents can remove packaged foods and sugary snacks and soft drinks from the home and replace them with organic healthy foods such 100% fruit juices, fresh fruits and vegetables, and raw nuts.  Parents are role models and by changing their lifestyles and diets, they can encourage and prevent children and adolescents from having serious health problems as adults.  However, this must start at an early age so that when children become older teens and young adults they will make wise, healthy choices.

Exercise Boosts Immunity and Fights Cancer

Can exercise help prevent cancer and boost the immune system? Researchers say, “Yes!”

Exercise Prevents Cancer

BEAT CANCER – Studies show that exercise boosts immune systems in cancer survivors and prevents cancer.

Those cancer survivors who engage in a regular physical exercise program or routine are more likely to improve rapidly and to avoid future cancers.

WHAT DOES RESEARCH SAY?
Researchers from the University of Nebraska announced at The Integrative Biology of Exercise VI meeting, October 10-13, 2012 in Westminster, Colorado, that exercise may boost the immune system and help to prevent cancer from reoccurring.

Laura Bilek, research team leader, and other researchers stated that if cancer survivors exercised for several weeks after finishing chemotherapy,

“…their immune systems remodel themselves to become more effective, potentially fending off future incidences of cancer.”  

Cancer Exercise TreadmillT cells in the blood of 16 cancer survivors were analyzed by the researchers before and after a 12-week exercise program. Researchers discovered that the immune cells of the subjects converted from a form that is less effective at fighting disease to one that is more effective in overcoming cancer and infections. Past research studies have shown that the majority of T cells become less effective at fighting off disease after chemotherapy.

Bilek said, “What we’re suggesting is that with exercise, you might be getting rid of T cells that aren’t helpful and making room for T cells that might be helpful.”

Cancer Exercise WomanWHAT TYPE OF EXERCISE IS BENEFICIAL?
It depends on the person’s physical condition. If a person is weak and out of condition, they should start slowly and gradually increase intensity and duration of physical exercise.  For the general population, the American Cancer Society recommends “at least 30 to 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity at least 5 days a week.”  Cancer survivors should not expect to start at this high level of activity, however.  Research shows that women who exercise at moderate-to-vigorous levels for more than three hours per week have a 30% to 40% lower risk of breast cancer. This result held true for all women, regardless of their family history or cancer risk level. Some research has found a 38% to 46% reduced risk of uterine cancer in active women.
Cancer Exercise Man
Kerry Courneya, PhD, professor and Canada Research Chair in Physical Activity and Cancer at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, says that many studies have been conducted that confirm that physical exercise helps to increase chances of recovering of cancer survivors and to prevent future cancers from developing. Courneya suggests aerobic exercises and weight training.

Cancer exercise


“Ideally, cancer survivors should do aerobic exercises and weight training,” says Courneya. “Both types of exercise are critical to the overall health and well-being of cancer survivors.”

Cancer woman runningAerobic exercises include things such as brisk walking, jogging, and swimming.  Aerobic exercise burns calories and helps increase metabolism and lose weight more rapidly.  It  lowers the risk of diabetes, stroke, and heart attack. Weight training builds muscle.  Cancer survivors sometimes lose muscle weight and gain fat, through cancer treatment. For those with a high fat-to-lean mass ratio, weight training can help improve physical fitness and is especially helpful to cancer survivors.

ACS Fitness Guidelines

Cancer survivors should remember that they didn’t make it through chemotherapy just to sit around all day and watch TV for the rest of their lives. The American Cancer Society recommends to start slowly, work with a coach, physical therapist, and/or with their primary doctor or healthcare professional. Survivors should set goals, have a complete physical exam and get approval from their oncologists before starting a moderate-to-vigorous exercise program.

REFERENCES
Courneya KS, “Exercise in cancer survivors: an overview of research.” University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. kerry.courneya@ualberta.ca, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise [2003, 35(11):1846-1852] Europe PubMed Central

Courneya KS, Mackey JR, Jones LW, “Coping with cancer: can exercise help?” Faculty of Physical Education, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2H9, CAN. kerry.courneya@ualberta.ca. The Physician and Sportsmedicine [2000, 28(5):49-73] Europe PubMed Central

Mock V, Dow KH, Meares CJ, Grimm PM, Dienemann JA, Haisfield-Wolfe ME, Quitasol W, Mitchell S, Chakravarthy A, Gage I, “Effects of exercise on fatigue, physical functioning, and emotional distress during radiation therapy for breast cancer.” Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, USA. Europe PubMed Central,  Oncology Nursing Forum [1997, 24(6):991-1000]

“Physical Activity and Cancer Risk,” Cancer.Net

“Active women can reduce risk of breast cancer by 12%, say researchers,” Press Association, The Guardian, Thursday 20 March 2014 14.04 EDT,

Mary Elizabeth Dallas, HealthDay Reporter, “Daily Exercise Lowers Breast Cancer Risk: Study”  HealthDay, March 20, 2014,

Jenny Hope, Medical Correspondent,“Exercising for an hour a day reduces the risk of breast cancer – regardless of a woman’s weight or age” , Mail Online, 12:39 EST, 20 March 2014

_________________________________

Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice Dart, M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University. Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.” She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.


Disclaimer: The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.