Pranic Healing – Energizing and Maintaining Optimum Health

sunset-473754_960_720What is Pranic Healing?
Pranic Healing is a revolutionary and comprehensive system of natural healing techniques that utilizes prana to treat various illnesses. Prana is a Sanskrit word literally meaning “life-force”, the invisible bio-energy or vital energy that keeps the body alive and maintains a state of good health. Continue reading

30 Tips for Reducing Stress Naturally

Are you feeling worried or stressed? Wondering how to avoid family conflicts? Feeling hopeless about managing your finances? Feeling overwhelmed, tired or fatigued?  Looking for a way out?  It’s the time of year when most of us are experiencing heightened feelings of anxiety and worry. Here are 30 safe and quick tips that have shown to be effective in reducing stress and anxiety any time of the year. Continue reading

What is Generalized Anxiety Disorder? – Causes, Symptoms, Treatment

Sleepy ManGeneralized Anxiety Disorder
People with Generalized Anxiety Disorder or GAD experience an excessive amount of worry about everyday subjects such as work, family, friends, and health. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) (2013) states that “Anxiety disorders affects about 40 million Americans age 18 years and older (about 18 percent) in a given year”. The feeling of anxiety is persistent and lasts for more than 6 months.

People with GAD tend to exaggerate the feeling of uneasiness and tension when there is no reason to worry. The disorder may keep people from doing things they enjoy because they are fearful of the consequences.

The disorder can develop at any age of a person’s lifetime whether it is during childhood or adulthood. The symptoms of the disorder can mimic other mood disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder. Generalized Anxiety Disorder can be a life-long condition. Women are twice more likely to be diagnosed with the illness than men (Anxiety and Depression Association of America, 2014).

Young child frightened parentsCauses of GAD
The cause(s) of Generalized Anxiety Disorder are unknown. There is evidence that the condition may be inherited however the findings are inconclusive. Environmental factors may play a role in the progression of the illness. Living in a stressful household or working in an uneasy workplace may exacerbate GAD (National Institute of Mental Health [NIMH], 2014).


AnxietySymptoms of GAD
The National Institute of Mental Health (2014) states that the physical symptoms of anxiety are “fatigue, headaches, muscle tension, muscle aches, difficulty swallowing, trembling, twitching, irritability, sweating, nausea, lightheadedness, having to go to the bathroom frequently, feeling out of breath, and hot flashes.”  Mayo Clinic (2014) provides a list of the general symptoms people may exhibit from the condition. The symptoms include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Persistent worrying or obsession about small or large concerns that’s out of proportion to the impact of the event
  • Inability to set aside or let go of a worry
  • Inability to relax, restlessness, and feeling keyed up or on edge
  • Difficulty concentrating, or feeling that your mind “goes blank”
  • Worrying about excessively worrying
  • Distress about making decisions for fear of making the wrong decision
  • Carrying every option in a situation all the way out to its possible negative conclusion
  • Difficulty handling uncertainty or indecisiveness

 Worried elderly woman

“People with GAD can’t seem to get rid of their concerns, even though they usually realize that their anxiety is more intense than the situation warrants. They can’t relax, startle easily, and have difficulty concentrating. Often they have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep.”   -National Institute of Mental Health (2014)


Worried depressed older manDiagnosis of GAD
When a person has persistent and excessive feelings of uneasiness, anxiety and worry for longer than 6 months, it is recommended to seek a medical professional to receive a diagnosis. Since the cause(s) of Generalized Anxiety Disorder are unknown, it can be difficult to properly diagnose the disorder without ruling out other illnesses that manifest similar symptoms. The doctor will perform a thorough mental health examination. If Generalized Anxiety Disorder is diagnosed, the doctor will discuss proper forms of treatment.

Treatments for GAD
Generalized Anxiety Disorder is commonly treated with three types of treatments: psychotherapy, medication, or lifestyle changes. In psychotherapy, cognitive behavior therapy is beneficial for people suffering from GAD.
Teenager stressed in libraryThe National Alliance on Mental Illness (2012) states that “Cognitive behavior therapy is a form of treatment that focuses on examining the relationships between thoughts, feelings and behaviors”.  People learn to think and react differently to certain stressful situations to prevent self-destructive behaviors and negative thoughts that could cause anxiety. Anti-anxiety medications such as benzodiazepines are used to treat GAD.

Antidepressant medications such as Prozac are also helpful in treating mood disorders; however people can have suicidal thoughts while on antidepressants.

Natural Holistic Lifestyle Changes
Mayo Clinic lists the following natural lifestyle changes that are helpful in preventing and treating GAD:

Young adults yoga

  • Keep physically active. Develop a routine so that you’re physically active most days of the week. Exercise is a powerful stress reducer. It may improve your mood and help you stay healthy. Start out slowly and gradually increase the amount and intensity of your activities.

Alcohol and depression

    • Avoid alcohol and other sedatives. These substances can worsen anxiety.
    • Quit smoking and cut back or quit drinking coffee. Both nicotine and caffeine can worsen anxiety.
  • Make sleep a priority. Do what you can to make sure you’re getting enough sleep to feel rested. If you aren’t sleeping well, see your doctor.
    Woman eating healthy salad
  • Eat healthy. Healthy eating-such as focusing on vegetables, fruits, whole grains and fish- may be linked to reduced anxiety, but more research is needed.


Alternative Treatments for Generalized Anxiety Disorder
In addition to the natural holistic lifestyle changes listed above, there are other effective natural and alternative methods for treating Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Some of the most popular methods are:  acupuncture,yoga, and meditation.

 

Acupuncture treatment

Acupuncture needles in woman’s spine

Acupuncture is a form of Chinese medicine that focuses on the human body’s flow of energy. With acupuncture, needles are inserted into certain areas of the body. Acupuncture is becoming more widely used as a treatment for a wide variety of mood disorders.


Yoga
is a Hindu philosophy. yoga matsThe goal of practicing yoga is to gain control over the mind and body through physical postures and breathing exercises. Research studies show that yoga can significantly reduce symptoms of stress and anxiety.

 

Meditation is a type of relaxation technique Meditation older peoplepeople use to calm the mind and to eliminate negative thoughts (National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2013). Many research studies have been conducted on the effects of meditation in reducing anxiety and stress. Recently the United States government has been  conducting research using meditation with men and women in the military.  See our article, “Marines are Meditating! Mindfulness- Based Fitness.”

 

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a serious condition which can begin at any age in a person’s lifetime.  If you believe you have GAD and your symptoms have lasted for more than six months, consult with your trusted family physician or health practitioner.  There are many treatment options available to help you.

 

References
Anxiety and Depression Association of America. (2014). Treating Anxiety Disorders. Complementary & Alternative Treatment. Retrieved November 18, 2014, from http://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/generalized-anxiety-disorder-gad

Duckworth, K., & Freedman, J. (2012, July). Treatment and Services. Retrieved November 19, 2014, from http://www.nami.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Inform_Yourself/
About_Mental_Illness/About_Treatments_and_Supports/Cognitive
_Behavioral_Therapy1.htm

Mayo Clinic. (2014). Definition. Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Retrieved November 21, 2014 from, http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/generalized-anxiety-disorder/basics/definition/con-20024562

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. (2013). Anxiety. Retrieved November 21, 2014 from, http://nccam.nih.gov/health/anxiety

National Institute of Mental Health. (2014). What is Generalized Anxiety Disorder?. Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). Retrieved November 21, 2014 from, http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/generalized-anxiety-disorder-gad/index.shtml

 

 

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This articleHang Pham, MBHA Health Educator is written by Hang Pham. Hang Pham is a Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance Health and Wellness Educator. Hang Pham was born in Hoc Mon, Vietnam. She came to America in 1994, becoming a U.S. citizen in 2011. Hang graduated from Seaside High School with diploma and received her AA in General Studies from Monterey Peninsula College in 2011. She received her BA in Collaborative Health and Human Services from California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB) in 2012. In addition to working as a volunteer staff with the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance, she currently works as a Clerical Aid in the Human Resources Department of Salinas City Hall. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.


Disclaimer:  
The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

 

 

Balancing the Chakras – A Healing of Your Energy Centers

chakras Chakras are Subtle Energy Centers. 

The word chakra is a Sanskrit word, and it means “wheel”. Today we will explore the 7 major chakras, which are connected to the body through the Nervous System. Because the chakras contain organs, emotions, thoughts, and consciousness, if they are out of  balance, it effects our physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual well-being. Each chakra is a generator and reservoir of energy.  When our chakras are balanced and working, playing together, our energy can flow freely, and we enjoy life more.

First Chakra: Earth element, dark red. Also called the Root Chakra, it is located at the base of your spine, buttocks and tailbone. It’s qualities are security, support, grounding, foundation, survival, stability, final manifestation, field of completion. The emotions connected to the First Chakra are fear, courage, trust.

 Chakra purposesSecond Chakra: Water element, deep dark orange. It is located at your belly, hips, pelvis, and low back. It’s qualities are intuition, creativity, receptivity, nurturing, sexuality, sensuality, family, generation-seed, unconscious emotions. Emotions: Attachment, lust, ‘holding on’, letting go, flowing, moderation, joy.

Third Chakra: Fire element, golden yellow. It is located at your stomach, solar plexus, and mid-back areas. Qualities: Will-power, name, fame, authority, motivation, vitality, inspiration, self-esteem, drive, control, impulse behind movement, action. Emotions: Anger, resentment, forgiveness, letting go.

Fourth Chakra: Air Element, emerald green, pink. Also called the Heart Chakra, it is located at your chest and upper back. The physical heart is to the left, the emotional heart is in the middle of your chest, inbetween your breasts, and the spiritual heart is a bit higher, between your breasts and your throat, where the Thymus Gland is. Qualities: Unconditional love, trust, devotion, conscious emotions, compassion, heart-felt feelings, breath. Emotions: Desire, greed, aversion, desirelessness, sadness, grief, charity, compassion.

Fifth Chakra: Ether element, light blue, turqoise. Also called the Throat Chakra, it is located at your throat and neck. Qualities: Creativity, intuition, spaciousness, will, communication, speaking your truth, self-expression, faith. Emotions: Pride, humility.

Sixth Chakra: Ether element (Light), dark blue, dark purple. Also called the Third Eye, it is located in the middle of your forehead, goes all the way through your brain to the back of your head, where your neck and skull meet. Qualities: Intuition, perception, insight, realization, intelligence, spirituality, vision. Emotions: Dreaming, clarity.

Seventh Chakra: Ether element (Consciousness), brilliant white and gold.  Also called the Crown Chakra, it is located at the top of your head, and goes a bit out of your head like a cone. Qualities: Union, connection to the divine, understanding, compassion. Emotions: Bliss.

SILENCE IN NATURE STEP 7Manifesting Journey: Take a few deep breaths. Imagine something you would like to have new year. Feel your vision in your Crown Chakra, surrounded by brilliant white and gold, connected to all of you. Your vision is coming down to your Third Eye, becoming a true desire. You can see your desire having come true. How is your life different now? Dark purple and blue have joined the white and gold, carrying your desire down to your Throat Chakra. Say to yourself outloud: “I am creating space in my life for….” Allow light blue and turqoise to join the other colors, carrying your desire to your Heart Chakra. Feel your self-love joining your heart’s desire. “I love myself enough to know that I deserve to have my desire become reality.” Emerald green and pink have joined the other colors, taking your desire down to the Third Chakra, into your stomach. Your will-power has now joined your desire, “This is my life. I have a right to have my desire be manifested.” What is the next action you can take in this process? See yourself taking it. Imagine that golden yellow has now joined the other colors, carrying your desire to the Second Chakra in your pelvis and low back. Feel that your desire is flowing into your life in a way that nurtures you. “I am allowing myself to receive this desire in an easy and joyful way.” Dark orange has now joined the other colors, creating a rainbow while taking your desire down to the  dark red Root Chakra – final manifestation.

See, feel, sense your desire as a full reality in your life, letting yourself relax deeply into it. YES!

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Rabia ErdumanThis article was written by Rabia Erduman, Health and Wellness Educator for the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance.  Rabia was born in Istanbul, Turkey and later spent ten years in Germany before arriving in the United States in 1983.  Rabia utilizes Psychology, Transpersonal Hypnotherapy, Craniosacral Therapy, Polarity Therapy, Reiki,  and Trauma Release to assist clients in their process of self-discovery. Rabia also teaches tantric and spiritually-oriented workshops.  Rabia is the author of Veils of Separation – Finding the Face of Oneness, and has four Guided Imagery CDs: Relaxation, Meditation, Chakra Meditation, and Inner Guides. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com

 

Disclaimer: The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

Top 30 Yoga Benefits

What are the benefits of yoga? How does the daily discipline of yoga affect the body, mind and spirit?

Yoga Benefits

30 Yoga Benefits

What is the History of Yoga?
Yoga is a holistic health and wellness activity that both relaxes and energizes the body. Yoga is a Sanskrit word meaning “union with God.” The common belief that Yoga derives from Hinduism is a misconception. Yoga actually predates Hinduism by many centuries. Ancient archeological finds discovered the Indus Valley provided unquestionable evidence that Yoga was practiced earlier than 3,000 B.C.E. and the classical techniques of Yoga may date back  to more than 5,000 years. The word Yoga means “to join or yoke together,” and it brings the body and mind together in harmony with one another. The whole system of Yoga is built on three main structures: exercise, breathing, and meditation. One of the earliest texts on Yoga  is believed to have been compiled by a scholar named Patanjali. This book contains Yoga theories and practices and is entitled Yoga Sutras (“Yoga Aphorisms”) and is thought to have been written as early as the 1st or 2nd century B.C. or as late as the 5th century A.D. This system is known as “Ashtanga Yoga.”  This is the eight limbs of Yoga, and referred to today as Classical Yoga. Most all forms of yoga include a variation of Patanjali’s original ancient yoga system.

 

What are the Different Types of Yoga?
There are over a hundred different schools of Yoga. There are many Yoga poses or postures within each of the different schools of Yoga.

Yoga PosesSome of the most well known schools of Yoga are as follows:

  1. Hatha Yoga  Hatha Yoga  is the most widely practiced form of yoga in the United States. It is the branch of yoga which concentrates on physical health and mental well-being using exercises and breathing control.  “Ha” can be translated to mean “sun” and “tha” to mean “moon” meaning to balance the opposite forces.
  2. Raja Yoga – Raja Yoga means the “King” of Yoga, or the royal path. It is a form of Hindu yoga intended to achieve control over the mind and emotions.
  3. Jnana Yoga – Jñāna yoga or “path of knowledge” is one of the types of yoga mentioned in Hindu philosophies. Jñāna is a Sanskrit word translated to mean “knowledge”.
  4. Bhakti Yoga  – Bhakti yoga is a spiritual path described in Hindu philosophy as focused on love of, faith in, and surrender to God. It is a means to awaken to God consciousness. It is a selfless devotion of reaching Brahman (God) in loving service.
  5. Karma Yoga – Karma Yoga is selfless action to reach perfection. “Karma” is a Sanskrit term meaning “action” or deed, either physical or mental. What makes a Karma Yogi is first the experience of union with God, and then selfless action.
  6. Tantra Yoga – Tantra yoga is a type of yoga designed to awaken the kundalini energy in the body and addressing relationships and sexuality. In Hinduism, the word Tantra means: 1) weaving and 2) the sacred scriptures of Hinduism, presented as a dialogue between Shiva and Shakti
  7. Kashmir Shaivism Yoga – Kashmir Shaivism is a transformative non-dual, yogic philosophy that originated in Kashmir in the ninth century. The goal of Kashmir Shaivism is to merge in Shiva or Universal Consciousness, or realize one’s already existing identity with Shiva, by means of wisdom, yoga and grace.

yoga older manWhat Does Research Tell Us About the Effectiveness of Yoga?
Sudarshan Kriya Yoga was concluded to be a potentially effective treatment in reducing or eliminating depression in a study by Janakiramaiah N and others (2000) and a review of clinical studies of the effectiveness of Hatha Yoga on depression by Uebelacker et al  (2010).

The prac­tice of yoga has been shown to be therapeutically useful in bron­chial asthmaNagarathna R, Nagendra HR (1985) concluded that “There was a significantly greater improvement in the group who practised yoga in the weekly number of attacks of asthma, scores for drug treatment, and peak flow rate.”  However, a 2011 systematic review of clinical studies suggests that there is no sound evidence that yoga improves asthma.

back pain personMultiple studies  have found yoga to be a helpful treatment in low back pain such as Sherman KJ, Cherkin DC, Wellman RD, et al (2011) and Tilbrook HE, Cox H, Hewitt CE, et al. (2011).   Other studies have shown yoga to be potentially helpful treatment for cardiovascular disease, such as Raub (2002), type II diabetes mellitus (Innes and Vincent, 2007),  stress and hypertension (Kiecolt-Glaser JK, and others, 2010) as well as other conditions. The practice of yoga can also play a role in the rehabilitation of those who have physical and mental challenges (Uma, et al, 2008).  Many other benefits are inherit in the practice of yoga as described below.

What Are the 30 Benefits of Yoga?

  1. Relieves Stress
  2. Improves Breathing
  3. Eases Pain
  4. Improves Circulation
  5. Increases Strength
  6. Increases Endurance
  7. Lowers Heart Rate
  8. Develops Inner Peace
  9. Lengthens Muscles
  10. Increases Flexibilityyoga mats
  11. Reduces Cortisol Level
  12. Improves Concentration
  13. Increases Range of Motion
  14. Dissolves Ego
  15. Develops Compassion
  16. Enhances Energy
  17. Heals Ailments
  18. Fosters Joy
  19. Lowers Weight
  20. Lubricates Joints
  21. Detoxes the Body
    yoga man
  22. Strengthens Abdomen
  23. Improves Memory
  24. Delays Wrinkles and Aging
  25. Burns Fat
  26. Improves Posture
  27. Improves Metabolism
  28. Builds Immune System
  29. Improves Balance
  30. Brings Harmony

Have you tried yoga? If so, how has it helped YOU?  Best wishes for a yoga-riffic day!!

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References
Bower JE, Woolery A, Sternlieb B, et al. Yoga for cancer patients and survivors. Cancer Control. 2005;12(3):165–171.

Innes, KE, Vincent HK, The Influence of Yoga-Based Programs on Risk Profiles in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review, Evid Based Complement Alternat Med., Dec 2007; 4(4): 469–486.
Jain SC, Talukdar B. Bronchial asthma and Yoga. Singapore Med J 1993;34:306-308

Janakiramaiah N. , Gangadhar B.N. , Naga Venkatesha Murthy P.J. , Harish M.G., Subbakrishna, D.K., Vedamurthachar A.  Antidepressant efficacy of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY) in melancholia: a randomized comparison with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and imipramine Volume 57, Issue 1 , Pages 255-259, January 2000

Kiecolt-Glaser JK, Christian L, Preston H, et al. Stress, inflammation, and yoga practice. Psychosomatic Medicine. 2010;72(2):113–121.

Monro R, Power J, Coumar A, Nagarathna R, Dandona P. Original research yoga therapy for NIDDM; A controlled trial. Complem Med J 1992;6:66-68.

Nagarathna R, Nagendra HR. Yoga for bronchial asthma; A controlled study. Br Med J 1985;291:1077-1079.

Ramesh L. Bijlani, Rama P. Vempati, Raj K. Yadav, Rooma Basu Ray, Vani Gupta, Ratna Sharma, Nalin Mehta, and Sushil C. Mahapatra.  A Brief but Comprehensive Lifestyle Education Program Based on Yoga Reduces Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Mellitus The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. April 2005, 11(2): 267-274. doi:10.1089/acm.2005.11.267.

Raub, JA. Psychophysiologic effects of hatha yoga on musculoskeletal and cardiopulmonary function: a literature review. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 2002;8(6):797–812.

Sherman KJ, Cherkin DC, Wellman RD, et al. A randomized trial comparing yoga, stretching, and a self-care book for chronic low back pain. Archives of Internal Medicine. 2011;171(22):2019–2026.

Telles S, Naveen K V. Yoga for rehabilitation : An overview, Vivekananda Kendra Yoga Research Foundation, No. 19, K.G. Nagar, Bangalore-560 019., India,  Indian J Med Sci 1997;51:123-7Monro R, Power J, Coumar A, Nagarathna R, Dandona P. Original research yoga therapy for NIDDM; A controlled trial. Complem Med J 1992;6:66-68.

Tilbrook HE, Cox H, Hewitt CE, et al. Yoga for chronic low back pain: a randomized trial. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2011;155(9):569–578.

Uebelacker LA, Epstein-Lubow G, Gaudiano BA, et al. Hatha yoga for depression: a critical review of the evidence for efficacy, plausible mechanisms of action, and directions for future research. Journal of Psychiatric Practice. 2010; 16(1):22–33.

Uma K, Nagendra HR, Nagarathna R., Vaidehi S, and Seethalakshmi R., The integrated approach of yoga: a therapeutic tool for mentally retarded children: a one-year controlled study, Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, Vol 33, Issue 5, 28 JUN 2008, DOI: 10.1111/ j.1365-2788.1989.tb01496


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Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice Dart, M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University. Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.” She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.

Disclaimer:
The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

Tai Chi Helps Reduce Falls in Stroke Survivors

Is Tai Chi effective with stroke survivors? Does Tai Chi help with balance and stability?

Tai Chi helps prevent falls

Tai Chi can help to prevent falls. Tai Chi is effective in developing both static and dynamic balance. Click, copy, download, save and share.


WHY IS TAI CHI IMPORTANT TO STROKE SURVIVORS?

Stroke survivors are very much prone to falls after stroke. Some statistics say that stroke survivors are likely to experience seven times as many falls each year than healthy adults.  Falls can result in social isolation, depression dependence, and cause fractures, limited mobility and increase a fear of falling. Tai Chi can help bring increased mobility, balance and control. This is essential to stroke survivors.

WHAT IS TAI CHI?
Tai chi is an ancient form of exercise, about 2,000 years old.  At one time more than 100 separate movements or postures were recorded.  It is a physical discipline that involves a continuous series of controlled, most often slow movements.  These movements are designed to improve physical and mental well-being.  Tai Chi is also called t’ai chi ch’uan, or  tai chi chuan.

It is estimated that more than 10 million people practice some type of t’ai chi every day in China.  Currently in modern-day Tai Chi practice, there are two popular versions, of 18 movements and 37 movements respectively. Tai Chi is the one of the most popular forms of exercise in the world.   Tai Chi students (or “players,” as they are called in China) often wear loose, comfortable clothing and either go barefoot or wear only socks or soft shoes on the feet. People in China usually practice Tai Chi outdoors in the morning, whereas people in the United States attend Tai Chi classes indoors.

Tai Chi Positions ChartTai Chi classes typically start with a few minutes of standing meditation.  This calms the mind, and helps participants to gather Chi or energy. Students then begin with warm-up exercises, and practice particular postures or forms.  Yang-style Tai Chi, as practiced in the study, is the most popular of five styles used in the United States.

WHAT DOES THE RESEARCH TELL US?
According to the latest research presented at the American Stroke Association‘s International Stroke Conference 2013, Tai Chi may help to reduce falls in stroke survivors.

In the report from the American Stroke Association, out of the three control groups, those stroke survivors practicing Tai Chi had fewer falls than the other two groups of stroke survivors: those receiving usual care or those participating in a national fitness program for Medicare-eligible adults called SilverSneakers.®

Tai Chi GroupResearchers recruited 89 stroke survivors – most of whom had ischemic strokes.   The study was a randomized prospective study conducted outside of a hospital setting. The average age of participants was 70 years old.  Forty-six (46) percent were women.  Most of the participants were college educated, Caucasian, and living in or around Tucson, Arizona.  The majority of the participants had had a stroke within three years prior to the research study.

The research study group was divided into three control groups:  1) 30 practiced Tai Chi, 2) 28 people took part in usual care and 3) 31 people participated in SilverSneakers®.   The Tai Chi and SilverSneakers® groups included specific exercise classes lasting one hour, three times every week for twelve weeks. The usual care group received a weekly phone call and given written information about how they could participate in a community physical exercise activity.

During the twelve-week period, there were 34 reported falls in participants’ homes mainly from slipping or tripping: five falls in the Tai Chi group; 15 falls in the usual care group; and 14 falls in the Silver Sneakers group. Four people asked for medical treatment.

According to the principal researcher, Ruth E. Taylor-Piliae, Ph.D., R.N., and assistant professor at the University of Arizona College of Nursing in Tucson, Arizona,

“Tai Chi is effective in improving both static and dynamic balance, which is important to prevent falls. Tai Chi is readily available in most U.S. cities and is relatively inexpensive.”

The results of this study were significant.  More research is needed to study the benefits of Tai Chi which can include: better balance, improved strength and balance, flexibility,  endurance, increased energy, a sense of well-being, reduced anxiety.

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Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice Dart,  M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University.
  Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.”  She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance.  The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3  nonprofit health and wellness education organization.  For more information about  the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.

Disclaimer: The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

Relax – It’s a Healthy Choice!

Are we relaxing enough? Do we have the skills we need to know how to relax?  Do you take time each day to relax and refresh?

Relax - It's a Healthy Choice!

Are we relaxing enough? Do we have the skills we need to know how to relax? Click, copy, download, save and share.


The Medical Significance of Relaxation
According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine:

“Relaxation is more than a state of mind; it physically changes the way your body functions.”

“When your body is relaxed breathing slows, blood pressure and oxygen consumption decrease, and some people report an increased sense of well-being. This is called the relaxation response. Being able to produce the relaxation response using relaxation techniques may counteract the effects of long-term stress, which may contribute to or worsen a range of health problems including depression, digestive disorders, headaches, high blood pressure, and insomnia.”

Man Meditating Nature

Meditation is an effective relaxation technique.


What Are Different Types of Relaxation Techniques?
According to Paul Lehrer, Paul M.; David H. (FRW) Barlow, Robert L. Woolfolk, and Wesley E. Sime (2007), in the book, Principles and Practice of Stress Management, there are a wide variety of techniques for relaxation.

Certain relaxation techniques known as “formal and passive relaxation exercises” are generally performed while sitting or lying quietly, with minimal movement and involve “a degree of withdrawal.”
These include:

  1. Autogenic training  – a relaxation technique developed Johannes Heinrich Schultz, published in 1932, using daily practice of sessions that last around 15 minutes, usually in the morning, at lunch time, and in the evening.
  2. Biofeedback – the use of electronic monitoring of a bodily function in order to train someone to control that function.  For example, measuring increased heart rate (a stress factor) and physically monitoring that to lower heart rate and reduce feelings of anxiety and stress.
  3. Deep breathing – breathing with focused, long breaths, as exercise or a method of relaxation.
  4. Meditationto engage in a spiritual or mental exercise or contemplation  for the purpose of reaching a heightened level of spiritual awareness or a state of deep relaxation.  For example, concentration on one’s breathing or repetition of a mantra.
  5. Mind-Body relaxation – Mind-body meditation goes by many different names, including mindfulness-based stress reduction and mindful meditation. It can involve multiple relaxation techniques including yoga, other meditation types, and including progressive relaxation
  6. Zen Yoga – a form of Eastern yoga, based on the teachings of Aaron Hoopes,  with the basic principle that basic breathing, movement and stretching exercises are achievable by anyone regardless of age, fitness, or health
    Progressive Muscle Relaxation
  7. Progressive Muscle Relaxation  a technique that involves tensing specific muscle groups and then relaxing them to create awareness of tension and relaxation, proceeding through all major muscle groups, relaxing them one at a time, and eventually leading to total muscle relaxation, made popular by Dr. Edmund Jacobson, in the 1920’s.
  8. Pranayama – (in Hindu yoga) the regulation of the breath through certain techniques and exercises in order to achieve a heightened state of conscious awareness or deep state of relaxation
  9. Visualization or Guided Imagery –  visualizing a peaceful situation or setting or engaging in positive changes or actions, in order to induce relaxation and decrease stress and anxiety,  improve self-confidence, or more effectively cope
  10. Yoga Nidra – a sleep-like lucid state which yogis report to experience during their meditations which is among the deepest possible states of relaxation while still maintaining full consciousness.
  11. Self-hypnosis – the state or act of hypnotizing oneself for the purpose of reaching a heightened state of awareness, eliminating negative habits, emotional burdens, anxieties, addictive behaviors, past trauma, negative habits, or to achieve a deep state of relaxation, contentment and peace.


Research on the Effects of Relaxation on Health
In the past 30 years, there has been considerable interest in studying the effects of stress and anxiety and on relaxation and health. Anxiety can be the root of a wide variety of physical, mental and emotional symptoms.

Anxiety Symptoms

Research shows that anxiety can cause a wide variety of symptoms which may be effectively treated and eliminated through relaxation therapy.

There is no evidence that relaxation techniques are harmful or can worsen illness symptoms.  There is evidence that relaxation techniques may be an effective part of an overall treatment plan for some health conditions. These health conditions include:

  1. anxiety
  2. depression
  3. headache
  4. pain
  5. temporomandibular disorder
  6. ringing in the ears
  7. smoking cessation
  8. overactive bladder
  9. nightmares
  10. hot flashes.

Daily disciplined practices of relaxation techniques are key to successfully achieving reduced stress and anxiety and optimum health and wellness of mind, body and spirit.

 

Resources

The American Institute of Stress

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Paul Lehrer, Paul M.; David H. (FRW) Barlow, Robert L. Woolfolk, and Wesley E. Sime, Principles and Practice of Stress Management, Guilford Press,  Aug 16, 2007

R.H. Schneider, C.N. Alexander, F. Staggers, M. Rainforth, J.W. Salerno, A. Hartz, S. Arndt, V.A. Barnes, and S.I. Nidich. “Long-term effects of stress reduction on mortality in persons 55 years of age with systemic hypertension.” Am J Cardiol 2005. May 1;95(9):1060–64.

J. Kabat-Zinn, A.O. Massion, J. Kristeller, L.G. Peterson, K.E. Fletcher, L. Pbert, W.R. Lenderking, and S.F. Santorelli. Effectiveness of a meditation-based stress reduction program in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Am J Psychiatry 1992 Jul;149(7):936–43

R.J. Davidson, J. Kabat-Zinn, J. Schumacher, M. Rosenkranz, D. Muller, S.F. Santorelli, F. Urbanowski, A. Harrington, K. Bonus, and J.F. Sheridan. Alterations in brain and immune function produced by mindfulness meditation. Psychosom Med 2003 Jul–Aug; 65(4):564–70.

K.H. Kaplan, D.L. Goldenberg, and M. Galvin-Nadeau. The impact of a meditation-based stress reduction program on fibromyalgia. Gen Hosp Psychiatry 1993 Sep; 15(5):284–89.

P. Gelderloos, K.G. Walton, D.W. Orme-Johnson, and C.N. Alexander. Effectiveness of the Transcendental Meditation program in preventing and treating substance misuse: a review. Int J Addict 1991 Mar; 26(3):293-325.

_______________________________


Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice Dart,  M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University.
  Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.”  She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance.  The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3  nonprofit health and wellness education organization.  For more information about  the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.

Disclaimer: The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

20 Alternative Approaches to Stress

Causes of StressWhat causes stress and how can we prevent it? Are there effective alternative, holistic, and complementary practices to treating stress besides prescription drugs?


What Does Current Research Say About Treatment for Stress?
Current studies show that Americans are not satisfied with healthcare programs addressing stress.

Stress statisticsA recent study entitled, “Stress in America™: Missing the Health Care Connection,”  was conducted online by Harris Interactive on behalf of the American Psychological Association, among 2,020 U.S. adults in August of 2012.   The results of the study suggest that people are not receiving what they need from their health care providers to effectively manage stress and help them with necessary lifestyle and behavior changes needed to improve their health.

Stress in America

Stress in America – 42% reported that the leading stress symptom they experienced was anger or irritability.

A little more than half (53%) of Americans said they receive little or no support for stress management from their providers.  Thirty-nine percent (39%) said that they have little or no behavior management support.  Thirty-five percent (35%) of Americans said that their stress increased this past year.

Stress effects on body

The effects of stress on the body

What are Stress Symptoms?
Stress symptoms can be emotional, physical, behavioral and mental or psychological.  A person under stress might have the following symptoms:

  • easily irritated
  • frustrated
  • mood swings
  • hopeless
  • not able to relax
  • low self-esteem
  • paranoia
  • trouble focusing
  • lonely
  • avoiding people and projects
  • headache
  • upset stomach
  • diarrhea
  • constipation
  • muscle pain
  • fatigue
  • sleepiness
  • insomnia
  • sweating
  • chills

    Stress Symptom Nail Biting

  • biting nails
  • grinding teeth
  • frightened
  • panic attack
  • trouble swallowing
  • cold or flu symptoms
  • shaking or shivering
  • pacing
  • drug use
  • negativity (criticism or gossip)


How is Stress Diagnosed and Treated?
There is no specific medical test for stress but your trusted healthcare provider or family physician should do a thorough medical and psychological exam and evaluation.  He or she will ask you about your family history, your work, your daily routine, and personal life to help determine “stress triggers”  and discuss a plan of treatment. It might be helpful for you to keep a stress diary for a few weeks to determine causes of stress.

EEG TestThe doctor might also order blood and urine lab tests, EEG, EMG, MRI, or other tests to rule out other illnesses that might be triggering stress symptoms. Basic tests will include measuring your blood pressure and completing a questionnaire to test for depression. After making diagnostic or psychological tests have been completed, your trusted healthcare practitioner may recommend treatment.

Treatment may include lifestyle changes such as changes in diet, physical activity or exercise, meditation, or prescription medications. If you don’t feel comfortable with the doctor’s evaluation or plan of treatment, it is important that you trust yourself and your own body wisdom when making a decision.  Make sure that you are working with a doctor as a member on your team, and that your healthcare professionals are working closely with you.

Which Types of Alternative Approaches Have Been Effective?

Alternative Stress Treatment

What holistic, alternative approaches are effective in treating stress?

There are many types of alternative approaches that have been shown to be effective in relieving stress, however, most approaches take time and training for the person to be skilled enough to use it successfully, or for the hands-on practitioner to be successful in working cooperatively with the client to achieve success.

Research studies show that alternative approaches can ]reduce or eliminate stress symptoms. Exercise has been well-documented as a stress-reducer, as has prayer, deep breathing, and meditation. Hypnosis and massage are also highly effective alternative treatments to prescription drugs.

Massage

Therapeutic massage is a well-documented  alternative treatment for alleviating stress.

Some of the natural approaches to relieving stress are:

  • Massage
  • Yoga
  • Tai Chi
  • Qigong
  • Deep Breathing
  • Biofeedback
  • Meditation
  • Prayer
  • Music therapy
  • Art therapy
  • Dance therapy
  • Drama therapy
  • Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT)
  • Flower Essences
  • Essential Oils
  • Homeopathic remedies
  • Light therapy
  • Crystals or gemstones
  • Guided imagery or visualization

    Acupuncture

    Acupuncture can be a successful alternative treatment to reducing stress related symptoms

  • Acupuncture
  • Self-hypnosis
  • Psychic healing
  • Energetic healing/Reiki
  • Counseling or Psychiatric
  • Physical therapy
  • Physical Exercise
  • Sex
  • Chiropractic

For more information about which alternative or complimentary therapies or approaches are best for your needs in treating anxiety or stress, consult with your trusted health-care practitioner, or check out the resources below.

Resources
The American Institute on Stress
The Stress Resource Center – Harvard
Healthfinder.gov – Stress Management
Holistic Stress Management for Nurses
American Psychological Association
Huffington Post -Reduce Stress Now
Mayo Clinic – Stress Management

Research
Keil, R.M.K. (2004) Coping and stress: a conceptual analysis Journal of Advanced Nursing, 45(6), 659–665


Viner, R. (1999) Putting Stress in Life: Hans Selye and the Making of Stress Theory. Social Studies of Science, Vol. 29, No. 3 (June 1999), pp. 391–410

O’Connor, T. M.; O’Halloran, D. J.; Shanahan, F. (2000). “The stress response and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis: From molecule to melancholia”. QJM : monthly journal of the Association of Physicians 93 (6): 323–333.

LE Walker Post-traumatic stress disorder in women: Diagnosis and treatment of battered woman syndrome.
– Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 1991

Hayes, Steven C.; Wilson, Kelly G.; Gifford, Elizabeth V.; Follette, Victoria M.; Strosahl, Kirk. Experiential avoidance and behavioral disorders: A functional dimensional approach to diagnosis and treatment. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol 64(6), Dec 1996, 1152-1168. doi: 10.1037/0022-006X.64.6.1152, Special Section: Development of Theoretically Coherent Alternatives to the DSM-IV.

_______________________________________


Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice Dart,  M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University.
 Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.”  She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance.  The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3  nonprofit health and wellness education organization.  For more information about  the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.

 Disclaimer:The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

Marines are Meditating! Mindfulness-Based Fitness

Meditating MarinesGuess who is singing “Om?” Those valiant men in the Marines are now practicing yoga exercises which include meditation techniques.

EVERYBODY’S DOING IT
If you are one of many individuals who practices a daily discipline of meditation, you are not alone.  Now some of the toughest men in the world have added this discipline to their rigorous training routine.

WHY ARE THE MARINES PRACTICING MEDITATION?
It is termed “Mindfulness-Based Fitness Training” and hoped that this Buddhist-inspired training will help those in the Marine Corps increase their ability control the mind, focus the attention on the moment and their mind in the present.  Right now suicide and post-traumatic stress disorder rates are high.  These techniques are meant to help Marines better handle stress.

Veterans PTSD Statistics

The incidence of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is high among veterans


WHAT RESEARCH WAS CONDUCTED?
A research study was conducted in 2011 involving two groups of 160 Marines.  One group used silent concentration and breathing techniques, under stress-induced situations, including screaming actors, controlled blasts and a setting created to look like an Afghanistan village.

Veteran TM-PTSD-study

The Effects of Transcendental Meditation on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder with Veterans

 The second group did not use these breathing and mindfulness techniques and were also exposed to the same combat stress-induced situation. Naval Medical Research Center scientist Douglas C. Johnson collected data and physical evidence of stress, blood and saliva samples, images of their brains and the results of problem-solving tests.   The results of this research is expected to be published later this spring.

Cadets Meditating

Cadets meditating

Another study by the same research scientist involves three separate control groups, each consisting of 80 Marines.  One group will receive mindfulness-based training, one will practice sports psychology training techniques, and the third will be a control group. Those results will be published later this year.

RESOURCES


REFERENCES

King, Lynda A.; King, Daniel W.; Fairbank, John A.; Keane, Terence M.; Adams, Gary A., Resilience–recovery factors in post-traumatic stress disorder among female and male Vietnam veterans: Hardiness, postwar social support, and additional stressful life events, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol 74(2), Feb 1998, 420-434.

EB Blanchard, LC Kolb, TP Pallmeyer, RJ Gerardi, A psychophysiological study of post traumatic stress disorder in Vietnam veterans  – Psychiatric Quarterly, 1982 – Springer


Marines expanding use of meditation training,
Washington Times


U.S. Marine Corps members learn mindfulness meditation and yoga in pilot program to help reduce stress,
Associated Press, Wednesday, January 23, 2013, 11:09 AM

Julie Watson, The Associated Press,Meditating Marines: Military tries mindfulness to lower stress, NBC News, Sunday Jan 20, 2013 11:00 AM



_________________________________

Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice Dart, M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University. Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.” She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.

Disclaimer:
The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

What is Ayurvedic Medicine?

Alternative Medicine

What is Ayurvedic Medicine? Ayurvedic medicine is a complementary alternative medicine system (CAM).  It incorporates other alternative therapies such as massage, exercise, and herbal remedies. Click, copy, download and save and share.

Hello, health friends. Hej, folk, der elsker sundhed.

WHAT IS AYURVEDIC? 
Ayurvedic medicine is said to have originated in India more than 5,000 years ago and has evolved the years. Ayurveda is one of the world’s oldest medical practices.  In the United States, Ayurvedic medicine is considered a CAM (complementary and alternative medicine) whole medical system.

Ayurveda means “the science of life,” originating from the Sanskrit words ayur (life) and veda (science or knowledge).   Many therapies used in Ayurvedic medicine are also used separately as a complete complementary medical system, such as massage, herbal remedies, and a special diet.   It integrates mind, body and spirit.  According to a recent National Health Interview Survey, more than 200,000 U.S. adults had used Ayurvedic medicine in the past year.

WHAT IS THE AYURVEDIC BELIEF?
Ayurvedic medicine is based on three basic concepts: 1) interconnectedness, 2) prakriti and 3) doshas.

Ayurvedic practitioners believe in interconnectedness — that all things are connected in the universe and disease occurs when we are out of balance with one or more things in the universe and/or within ourselves. When we are in harmony with mind, body and spirit and in harmony with others and the universe, then we are healthy.

Prakriti is one’s constitution, or one’s general health and ability to heal and recover. According to Ayurveda, prakriti is something that is unchangeable and the underlying condition that one is born with and is a combination of physical and psychological characteristics that affect the bodily functions.

Doshas are known by their original Sanskrit names: vata, pitta, and kapha.  Each dosha is composed of five elements: air, water, fire, earth, and space.   1) Vata – ether and air,  2) Pitta – fire and water 3) Kapha – earth and space.

WHAT HAPPENS IN AN AYURVEDIC SESSION?
An ayurvedic practitioner asks a person about diet, lifestyle, history of illnesses, checking urine, bowel movement, speech, pulse, tongue, skin, eyes, weight, overall appearance.  The treatment involves a change in diet, herbal supplements, massage, exercises including breathing techniques and meditation.  Some concerns have been presented over typically presribed herbs, metals, minerals or materials that can be toxic to the body. Caution should be taken when ingesting herbal remedies.   In 2004,  NCCAM (the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine) published research findings stating that of 70 Ayurvedic remedies purchased over-the-counter, 14 contained lead, mercury, and/or arsenic at levels that could be harmful. All were manufactured in Southeast Asia.  Also in same year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that in a recent three-year period, 12 cases of lead poisoning were linked to the use of Ayurvedic medications.

Have you tried Ayurvedic Medicine?  How did it work for you?  Like and share with friends.

Best wishes from your health and wellness friends at MBHA.

NCCAM (National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine)
CDC (Centers for Disease Control)