Edema: Why Are My Joints Swollen and What Can I Do?

EdemaWhat is Edema?
Edema is the medical term for swelling. Generally, edema is a response to injury or inflammation. The swelling occurs from leaking blood vessels which release fluid into the body tissues.  Increased fluid from the blood vessels allows more white blood cells to enter the area, and the white blood cells help to fight off the infection, but if too much fluid is released, too often or for to long, this can cause discomfort and may lead to permanent damage.

What are the Symptoms of Edema?
Symptoms of edema depend on which area is swollen. The primary symptom is pain and tenderness at the site, however other symptoms, usually present with the swelling include:

  • Weight gain
  • Aching limbs or joints
  • Sharp stabbing pain
  • Burning pain
  • Itching or crawling sensation
  • Pins and needles or tingling sensation
  • Stiff joint or creaking or popping of jointbruised foot
  • Discoloration, redness or bruising of skin
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Heaviness and tiredness or fatigue
  • Limited or restricted joint movement
  • Hot or warm skin
  • Fever
  • Nausea (if head and brain trauma)
  • Dizziness (if head trauma)


What Causes Edema?
computer
There are several common causes of edema. Using the computer or writing for long hours, being overweight or pregnant or having a job where you must stand or sit for long periods of time increases pressure on leg veins and result in swelling in the legs and feet.

tennis playerPlaying tennis or other sports, can cause repetitive stress disorder or chronic stress injury to the wrists, shoulders and elbows or other joints, resulting in edema in these joints. The primary cause of edema is inflammation.  Inflammation can occur from a medical condition or disease or from trauma, such as would occur with:

 

  • repetitive chronic stress disorder
  • trauma or blow causing sprain
  • muscle or tendon strain
  • an insect or animal bite
  • a skin infection

  • fractured bone
  • an allergic reaction

Other causes of edema are related to serious medical conditions such as:

  • arthritis
  • concussion
  • pregnancy and preclampsia
  • thyroid disease
  • hypoalbuminemia
  • deep vein thrombosis (blood clot)

  • varicose veins
  • lymphedema or lymphatic obstruction
  • liver disease
  • kidney disease
  • cancer, metastases or benign tumor or cyst
  • heart failure or heart disease
  • diabetes

  • osteoporosis
  • severe burns
  • life-threatening trauma
  • hyponatremia (very low sodium)
  • hypothyroidism
  • Kawasaki disease (rare disease that involves blood vessel inflammation)

Can Medications or Supplements Cause Edema?
Edema is sometimes a reaction to medications. If you are taking a prescription and notice sudden edema, it is very important to report this to your trusted health practitioner or doctor.  Swollen ankles or knees can be a side effect of some blood pressure medicines.  Calcium channel blockers make small blood vessels open wider and, in some people, this can cause more fluid to leak out of the blood vessels into the tissues, resulting in edema.  Edema can also be a side effect of some oral diabetes medications, and non-prescription pain relievers (such as ibuprofen), and estrogens.

medicationsGlucosamine-chondroitin supplements are commonly used for relief of osteoarthritis pain. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons report that it has anti-inflammatory properties and seems to reduce joint pain.  However, glucosamine-chondroitin supplements have been connected with side effects that include: nausea, diarrhea, constipation, heartburn, and more serious side effect can include edema of the ankles and feet, heart palpitations and other heartbeat irregularities. If you are taking these supplements and have these serious side effects that could indicate heart, circulatory system problems or fluid retention, you should immediately contact a medical professional.

How Can I Prevent Edema?
The prevention or treatment of edema depends on the body part that is affected, yet some general changes in lifestyle can be helpful. Mild edema usually disappears on its own with proper rest and natural treatment. If you suspect your edema is caused from a serious medical condition listed above, such as blood clots, liver disease, concussion, kidney disease, heart failure, and/or others you would be wise to consult with your doctor or trusted health practitioner. More severe edema is often treated with drugs that are used to help the body expel excess fluid in the form of urine (diuretics). One of the most common diuretics is furosemide (Lasix).  This is usually prescribed with heart failure to remove the fluid from the heart or lungs.  For less serious situations, there are some preventative measures one can take to lower the risk of edema or to reduce swelling.

Elevate Leg

  1. Elevate the affected body part. One of the easiest ways to treat swelling is to elevate the swollen area, for example the feet or legs. This will stimulate circulation and reduce pain and inflammation. Lie down on the bed or couch and prop your feet and legs up on pillows.
  2. Reduce salt and sodium in the diet.  Lower the sodium level can help prevent or lower fluid retention.  Avoid packaged foods, canned or boxed soups, chips, and crackers that tend to be high in sodium. Read labels carefully and throw out foods with high sodium levels. Generally make sure sodium content on the label is less than 140 milligrams per serving or 500 milligrams per meal. However, you might need less sodium per day, depending on your medical conditions. Woman drinking water
  3. Drink plenty of water. Dehydration will exacerbate inflammation and swelling. Keep a water bottle or thermos with you when you leave your home. In general, you should try to drink between half an ounce and an ounce of water for each pound you weigh.  You might wonder how drinking more water can help reduce the fluids that are causing the edema. When you drink more water, the kidneys send a message to flush both salt and water from the body that can contribute to your edema.
  4. Take stretch breaks or change positions. If you have a work schedule that causes you to stand on your feet for hours or if you sit in one position throughout the day, consciously change positions several times an hour, even if it’s just to move around for a minute or two to get your blood flowing. Do this several times each hour to prevent swelling in the knees, ankles, feet and legs.massage.jpg
  5. Therapeutic massage. If your edema is not caused from a serious injury or skin infection but is caused from inflammation or strain, you might benefit from a relaxing massage to help the blood flow and circulation. However, massage can aggravate edema if there is injury to the muscle or bone. Be sure to consult with a trusted health care professional before engaging in massage therapy.
  6. Physical therapy or exercise. A physical therapist or exercise coach can be very helpful in designing a therapeutic rehabilitation plan for you based on your particular needs. Work with your trusted doctor or health practitioner to schedule you to work with a sports therapist or physical therapist.swim therapy osteoporosis
  7. Water therapy, hydrotherapy or aqua therapy. Water therapy is very effective and less likely to aggravate swelling caused from injury or trauma. Studies have shown it to be effective with arthritis patients and elderly to increase circulation, reduce inflammation and edema. Some hospitals have water pools or tubs in the physical therapy department, as do some recreational or sports and physical rehabilitation centers. Check with your health practitioner to prescribe water therapy treatments if this is a good fit for you.
  8. Compression socks.  If you have circulation problems that cause peripheral edema (swelling) in the feet, ankles and legs, your practitioner or doctor might recommend compression socks or support hose. This may occur with heart disease, varicose veins, arthritis and diabetes.  These socks are often labeled as diabetic socks because they are commonly prescribed to those with diabetes.  Check with your doctor to see if this is something that would help you.

  9. Soft braces or splints.  If the cause of your swelling is tendonitis or a sprain, strain or fracture your health care practitioner might recommend a splint or soft brace to keep you from injuring the area and to restrict motion while healing. However, it may be recommended to remove the brace throughout the day to provide circulation to the area. Your health care provider might recommend that you participate in exercises and therapy while wearing splints or braces.
     
     

    References

    Chatterjee D, McGee A, Strauss E, Youm T, Jazrawi L Subchondral Calcium Phosphate is Ineffective for Bone Marrow Edema Lesions in Adults With Advanced Osteoarthritis.   Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2015 Apr 28. [Epub ahead of print]  PMID:  25917421

    Eshed I, Miloh-Raz H, Dulitzki M, Lidar Z, Aharoni D, Liberman B, Lidar M.    Peripartum changes of the sacroiliac joints on MRI: increasing mechanical load correlating with signs of edema and inflammation kindling spondyloarthropathy in the genetically prone.,  Clin Rheumatol. 2015 May 26. [Epub ahead of print]  PMID: 26006255

    Feger MA, Goetschius J, Love H, Saliba SA, Hertel J.      Electrical stimulation as a treatment intervention to improve function, edema or pain following acute lateral ankle sprains: A systematic review.. 2015 Jan 26. pii: S1466-853X(15)00003-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2015.01.001. [Epub ahead of print] Review.PMID:25791198

    Martinelli N, Bianchi A, Sartorelli E, Dondi A, Bonifacini C, Malerba F   Treatment of bone marrow edema of the talus with pulsed electromagnetic fields: outcomes in six patients.  J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 2015 Jan-Feb;105(1):27-32. doi: 10.7547/8750-7315-105.1.27.  PMID: 25675223 z

    Mayo Clinic,  Diseases and Conditions, Edema, Accessed 5/15/2015 http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/edema/basics/definition/con-20033037

    MedlinePlus, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Accessed 5/15/2015 http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/edema.html

    Rossi FH, Liu W, Geigel E, Castaneda S, Rossi EM, Schnacky K.  Painful legs and moving toes syndrome responsive to pregabalin.    J Postgrad Med. 2015 Apr-Jun;61(2):116-9. doi: 10.4103/0022-3859.153106.   PMID:  25766346

    Van Kampen M, Devoogdt N, De Groef A, Gielen A, Geraerts I.   The efficacy of physiotherapy for the prevention and treatment of prenatal symptoms: a systematic review.  Int Urogynecol J. 2015 Mar 31. [Epub ahead of print]  PMID: 25822028

    WebMD, Edema Overview, Accessed 5/15/2015 http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-failure/edema-overview

     

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    This article is written by Jean Voice Dart, M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University. Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.” She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.  Images used in this article are free public domain from Pixabay.com orPublicdomainpictures.net  Other images are credited.

     

    Disclaimer: The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

Herbal Remedies During Pregnancy

WHAT ARE THE COMMON SYMPTOMS OF PREGNANCY?
The human body goes through a metamorphosis during the nine months of pregnancy. Women’s bodies are constantly changing and adapting to the symptoms that arise with the growing fetus inside the uterus. Mayo Clinic (2015) provides a list of the common symptoms associated with pregnancy. Pregnancy symptoms include, but are limited, to the following:

  • Tender swollen breasts
  • Nausea with or without vomiting
  • Increased urination
  • Fatigue
  • Food aversions or cravings
  • Slight vaginal bleeding
  • Cramping
  • Mood swings
  • Dizziness
  • Constipation

Pregnant Couple BeachHOW CAN HERBAL REMEDIES HELP?
Pregnancy symptoms can be difficult to handle for some women. In those instances, over-the-counter or prescribed medicine from a health professional may be utilized. Woman may also seek herbal remedies to aid with their harsh pregnancy symptoms. Herbal remedies can provide additional nutrients for the pregnant woman and her growing baby.

IT’S WISE TO BE CAUTIOUS
Since everything women eat is also being consumed by the fetus growing inside of the uterus, it’s important to seek the advice from a medical professional before trying any herbal remedies during pregnancy. It’s not recommended to take any kind of herbal supplements or medicine during the first trimester of pregnancy.

According to the American Pregnancy Association (2013),
“unlike prescription drugs, natural herbs and vitamin supplements do not go through the same scrutiny and evaluation process by the FDA”.

herbs and spicesIt’s wise to be cautious when it comes to herbal remedies in general, especially during pregnancy. Not all herbs are safe to consume. Some may cause miscarriage, premature labor, and/or abdominal pain. Injury to the fetus is possible. The US Food and Drug Administration has a rating system for herbs during pregnancy. The rating system consists of these categories: likely safe, possibly safe, and likely unsafe during pregnancy.The American Pregnancy Association (2015) lists the herbs that are likely safe or possibly safe during pregnancy.

SAFE HERBS FOR USE DURING PREGNANCY

Red Raspberry LeafRed Raspberry Leaf– Rich in iron, this herb has helped tone the uterus, increase milk production, decrease nausea, and ease labor pains

Peppermint LeavesPeppermint Leaf – Helpful in relieving nausea/morning sickness and flatulence

gingerGinger root – Helps relieve nausea and vomiting

Slippery Elm BarkSlippery Elm Bark – (when the inner bark is used orally in amounts used in foods) Used to help relieve nausea, heartburn, and vaginal irritations

Oat FieldOats & Oat Straw – Rich in calcium and magnesium; helps relieve anxiety, restlessness, and irritated skin

dandelionDandelion – Rich in Vitamin A, calcium, and iron; dandelion root and leaf can also help relieve mild edema and nourish the liver

chamomileChamomile (German) – High in calcium and magnesium; also helps with sleeplessness and inflammation of joints

stinging nettleNettles (Stinging Nettles) – High in vitamins A, C, K calcium, potassium, and iron. Used in many pregnancy teas because it is a great all around pregnancy tonic.

 

cup of hot tea
DRINKING HERBAL TEAS

Herbal teas such as raspberry, peach, lemon or peppermint are safe to drink during pregnancy. Not only is drinking herbal tea soothing for the mind and body, but the teas offer a good source of vitamin and minerals for the mother-to-be and baby.

Pregnant Mother Baby ClothesWHICH HERBS SHOULD BE AVOIDED?
Some herbal remedies to avoid during pregnancy include ginger, jasmine, aloe vera, caraway, celery seed, chamomile, oregano, nutmeg, and passion flower. If taken in large amounts, these herbs can cause early contractions, miscarriage, or premature labor. This is not a complete list of herbal remedies of which to be cautious. For more information, individual research can be  reviewed to ensure a safe and healthy pregnancy, and always consult with a trusted family doctor or health practitioner.

 

REFERENCES

American Pregnancy Association. (2013). Herbs and Pregnancy: What are the risks?. Herbs and Pregnancy. Retrieved March 19, 2015

Deep Roots at Home. (2015). Red Raspberry Leaf/Pregnancy Herb-Collect Now, Pt. 1. Retrieved March 19, 2015

Food Safety Information Council. (2015). What is listeria?  Listeria and Pregnancy, the Elderly and People with Weakened Immune Systems. Retrieved March 19, 2015

Mayo Clinic. (2015). Classic Symptoms of Pregnancy. Symptoms of Pregnancy: What happens right away. Retrieved March 19, 2015

Simpson et al., “Raspberry Leaf in Pregnancy: Its Safety and Efficacy in Labor,” Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health 46, no. 2 (March–April 2001): 51–59

 

 

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This articleHang Pham, MBHA Health Educator is written by Hang Pham. Hang Pham is a Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance Health and Wellness Educator. Hang Pham was born in Hoc Mon, Vietnam. She came to America in 1994, becoming a U.S. citizen in 2011. Hang graduated from Seaside High School with diploma and received her AA in General Studies from Monterey Peninsula College in 2011. She received her BA in Collaborative Health and Human Services from California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB) in 2012. In addition to working as a volunteer staff with the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance, she currently works as a Clerical Aid in the Human Resources Department of Salinas City Hall. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.   All images are copyright free, from www.pixabay.com unless otherwise noted.

Disclaimer:  The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

The Uses and Benefits of Cayenne Pepper

Cayenne PeppersThe Greek physician, Hippocrates, famously said, “Let food be thy medicine, and medicine be thy food.”  Knowing about foods and their benefits gives us the power to direct our health in a positive direction. This article will examine the benefits and uses of cayenne pepper for enhanced health and healing.

THE EVOLUTION OF CAYENNE PEPPER FOR HEALING
Cayenne peppers originated in South America and have been cultivated for over 7,000 years. These peppers served as decoration first then were used to add flavor and heat to foods, and eventually, cayenne was used for medicinal properties. Time has validated its usage as expressed by Dr. Patrick Quillin: “Recent clinical studies have been conducted on many of the old time health applications for this miracle herb. Again and again, the therapeutic value of cayenne pepper has been medically validated”.

Cayenne SpicesWHAT IS A CAYENNE PEPPER?
Cayenne possesses a high concentration of a substance called capsaicin, which is known for its pain-relief and decongestant properties as well as its ability to lower the risk of heart attack and ulcers. The bright red color of the pepper indicates the contents of immunity-boosting vitamin A (the pepper contains almost 50% of daily needs).


WHAT ARE COMMON USES AND BENEFITS?

Cayenne is an amazing food and is mild enough to be eaten at every meal, but might be powerful enough to stop a heart attack. It has been shown to relieve a variety of ailments including

    1. Sick Personheartburn,
    2. lumbago,
    3. delirium,
    4. flatulence,
    5. sore throat,
    6. nausea,
    7. gout,
    8. fever,
    9. dyspepsia,
    10. irritation,
    11. influenza,
    12. headaches,
    13. allergies,
    14. indigestion,
    15. joint pain,
    16. tremors,
    17. inflammation,
    18. fungal infections,
    19. arthritic pain,
    20. paralysis,
    21. snake bite,
    22. rheumatism,
    23. tooth aches/infections,
    24. sores,
    25. wounds,
    26. hemorrhoids,
    27. high blood pressure,
    28. fibromyalgia,
    29. tonsillitis

If used topically, a handful of cayenne powder applied to a wound can equalize the blood, help with clotting, and cease blood loss. If ingested, it should be noted that the spiciness of the peppers can cause some indigestion.

DOES CAYENNE PEPPER AFFECT THE HEART?
Cayenne Pepper PowderJohn Raymond Christopher (1909–1983), an American herbalist often referred to as “Dr. Christopher,” testifies to this astounding power: “In 35 years of practice, and working with the people and teaching, I have never on house calls lost one heart attack patient and the reason is, whenever I go in, if they are still breathing, I pour down them a cup of cayenne tea (a teaspoon of cayenne in a cup of hot water), and within minutes they are up and around.”

A personal account of cayenne’s life-changing power can be found in the book, Left for Dead, by Dick Quinn. He had quadruple bypass surgery as a result of heart disease and was left in a state of immobility and poor health. One day on a trip to the park with fMan's heartamily, Dick was sitting his wheelchair and was approached by an elderly lady who was full of life and energy. When he explained that he had heart disease and then a quadruple bypass but wasn’t recovering very well, she suggested that he take a teaspoon of cayenne pepper. He didn’t take her advice right away, but his health kept deteriorating and most options had been exhausted. The time arrived that he was finally ready to try cayenne. He took a teaspoon of cayenne, followed it down with some water and after a shocking moment of extreme discomfort, he felt wonderful! In a few hours he went from hardly being able to get out of bed to shoveling snow and has spent his life spreading the wonders of cayenne.

CAYENNE PEPPER FOR WEIGHT LOSS
Cayenne pepper has been shown to be effective in reducing weight. At the Laval University in Quebec, scientists correlated a decreased appetite with eating cayenne as a part of breakfast, which led to less  caloric intake throughout the day. Because of its heat, cayenne also boosts metabolism by aiding the body in burning fat. The metabolic miracle lies in the heat production (known as thermogenesis) and oxygen consumption for up to 20 minutes after the pepper is eaten.

TeaHOW IS CAYENNE INGESTED?
Cayenne can be used topically or can be ingested as a powder, capsule, or eaten as a whole pepper (not for the faint of heart!).  Powdered cayenne can be added to warm water to create a tea-like substance and crushed red pepper can be interspersed in almost any dish as a substitute or in addition to black pepper.

TIPS ON GROWING AND PREPARING CAYENNE PEPPERS
Easy to grow, cayenne peppers make a wonderful addition to a garden. The peppers go through stages on the vine shifting from green, to orange, and finally a brilliant red color with the outer flesh softening through every stage.Once your soft, bright red pepper is harvested, you can slice it open and collect the seeds to be dried and used in future planting. Cayenne PepperWith the seeds removed, you can cook the peppers on a foil-lined cookie sheet at a maximum of 175 degrees Fahrenheit for 6-10 hours, or, if you leave the pepper whole, for 8-12 hours. Once the peppers are dried, you can break the stem off and crush them into a course powder. The peppers can also be stored and freshly crushed when needed.

The benefits of this superfood are truly staggering and I encourage you to seek your own experiences with it!

REFERENCES

  1. Ahuja KD, Robertson IK, Geraghty DP, Ball MJ. The effect of 4-week chilli supplementation eton metabolic and arterial function in humans. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Mar;61(3):326-33. Epub 2006 Aug 23. PubMed
  2. Bortolotti M, Porta S. Effect of red pepper on symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome: preliminary study. Dig Dis Sci. 2011 Nov;56(11):3288-95. doi: 10.1007/s10620-011-1740-9. Epub 2011 May 15.  PubMed
  3. Chrubasik S, Weiser T, Beime B. Effectiveness and safety of topical capsaicin cream in the treatment of chronic soft tissue pain. Phytother Res. 2010 Dec;24(12):1877-85. doi: 10.1002/ptr.3335. PubMed 
  4. Complete Online Writings of Dr. John Christopher, Online School of Natural Healing 100 Herb Syllabus
  5. Loeser J, Pilgram B, Dagtekin O. [Chili for therapy of trigeminus neuralgia: a case report]. Schmerz. 2012 Aug;26(4):435-7. doi: 10.1007/s00482-012-1180-2. PubMed
  6. P.C. Agarwal, Usha Dev, Baleshwar Singh, Indra Rani, Dinesh Chand, R.K. Khetarpal. Seed-borne fungi identified from exotic pepper (Capsicum spp.) germplasm samples introduced during 1976–2005. PGR Newsletter – Bioversity. issue. 149, pp.39-42.
  7. Quinn, Dick, Left for Dead, R F Quinn Pub Co, December 1991, ISBN-10: 0963283901
  8. Saito M, Yoneshiro T. Capsinoids and related food ingredients activating brown fat thermogenesis and reducing body fat in humans. Curr Opin Lipidol. 2013 Feb;24(1):71-7. doi: 10.1097/MOL.0b013e32835a4f40.  PubMed
  9. Urashima M, Segawa T, Okazaki M, Kurihara M, Wada Y, Ida H. Randomized trial of vitamin D supplementation to prevent seasonal influenza A in schoolchildren. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 May;91(5):1255-60. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2009.29094. Epub 2010 Mar 10. PubMed
  10. Whiting S, Derbyshire E, Tiwari BK. Capsaicinoids and capsinoids. A potential role for weight management? A systematic review of the evidence. Appetite. 2012 Oct;59(2):341-8. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2012.05.015. Epub 2012 May 22. PubMed

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Jessica JohnsonThis article was written by Jessica Johnson. Jessica is a Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance Health and Wellness Educator. Jessica has a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in Management with an Economics and International Studies Minor from the University of Central Misouri (UCM). She is currently working as Assistant Manager and Sales Representative in Pacific Grove, California. She was Vice President of Delta Epsilon Iota Honor Society from 2011-2012 and is a sales representative for Young Living Essential Oils Company. Jessica is passionate about holistic health and healing. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at http://www.montereybayholistic.com. All images are copyright free, from http://www.pixabay.com unless otherwise noted.

Disclaimer: The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.