Medicinal Tea – History, Benefits and Precautions

green teaTea has long been used for medicinal purposes. What is the origin and history of medicinal tea? What are the three varieties of tea? What are the primary benefits of medicinal tea?  Are there certain types of tea that can be dangerous for particular ailments or conditions? Learn the answers to these questions and much more. Continue reading

Edema – Natural Prevention and Treatment of Swollen Joints

EdemaWhat is Edema?
Edema is the medical term for swelling. Generally, edema is a response to injury or inflammation. The swelling occurs from leaking blood vessels which release fluid into the body tissues.  Increased fluid from the blood vessels allows more white blood cells to enter the area, and the white blood cells help to fight off the infection, but if too much fluid is released, too often or for to long, this can cause discomfort and may lead to permanent damage. What are the symptoms of edema? Does sitting at the computer for long hours cause edema? Are there natural treatments that are effective? How can it be prevented?
Continue reading

Sugar – What are the Negative Side Effects?

Sugar SucroseWhat is sugar?
Sugar is a kind of carbohydrate. There are two main types of simple sugars: glucose and fructose. The two main types of sugar are white and brown sugar. White sugar is commonly known as “table sugar,” which is used in most households to make food.Brown sugar has some surface molasses syrup.

Sugar

Types of sugar:   raw sugar, brown sugar, refined sugar (castor sugar), white sugar,  liquid sugar, glucose syrup, treacle (unprocessed sugar), sugar crystals and powdered sugar

Brown sugar is used for foods that are thicker and denser such as cookies, cakes and pies.

Sugar in all foods

Sugar is often added to sauces, casseroles, salad dressings, gravies, fruit glazes, and in  many baked foods

Sugar is also used to enhance the taste of food and is found as an ingredient in an abundance of foods. These foods include, but are not limited, to the following:

  • Breakfast  – waffles, pancakes, cereal, pastries, scones, granola
  • Lunch – soups, juices, sodas, bread, and yogurt
  • Dinnerdinner rolls,  mashed potatoes, stews, pastas, casseroles

 

What is glucose and why do we need it?

Blood glucose levelsThe human body breaks down the carbohydrates we eat to create glucose. Glucose is the body’s main source of energy. Sugar can be quickly absorbed into the blood stream.

Glucose processThe quick absorption of sugar creates energy boosts. Glucose is turned into glycogen and stored in the liver. The liver has the capacity to store only 100 grams of glucose in the form of glycogen. Excess glycogen will be stored as fat in the adipose tissues of the body.


How much sugar do we need?
The World Health Organization (WHO) recently drafted new guidelines on sugar intake. The World Health Organization states that “sugars should be less than 10% of the total energy intake per day….Five percent of total energy intake is equivalent to around 25 grams (around 6 teaspoons) of sugar per day for an adult of normal Body Mass Index (BMI).” These new guidelines were based on results from numerous scientific studies on sugar.


Sugar in DrinksHow much sugar do we consume?
Sugar and foods with sugar are made readily available for purchase in grocery stores, local businesses and schools. Fast food restaurants sell many food items that contain white and brown sugar. Public schools have vending machines that dispense snacks and carbonated beverages. The Western diet is composed of countless low-cost, high processed foods containing high-fructose corn syrup. Many of these carbonated beverages contain more than 40 grams of sugar in one serving, which is more than the recommended daily intake of sugar.

Child eating Frosted FlakesOne serving of frosted flakes cereal has roughly 38.7 grams of sugar, and one box of 8 chocolate chip cookies has over 39 grams of sugar. An article written by Robert Lustig, Laura Schmidt, and Claire Brindis from the University of California, San Francisco titled The Toxic Truth about Sugar states that “Currently, each US citizen consumes an average of 216 liters of soda per year, of which 58% contains sugar…” Excessive amounts of sugar will lead to weight gain, and an increase in the likelihood of acquiring diseases such as Type 2 Diabetes and heart disease.


Sugar AddictionWhat are the negative side effects of sugar?
Consuming white sugar has its benefits such as giving your body the energy it needs and maintaining a healthy look for the skin. However, consuming sugar has its negative side effects. Sugar, not derived from natural sources, has no nutritional value or healthy fats. The consequences of eating too much white sugar are provided, but are not limited, in the following:

  • Obesity
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Hypertension
  • Myocardial Infarction
  • Hepatic Dysfunction
  • Type 2 Diabetes

What are Diabetes Symptoms?

What is Type 2 Diabetes?
Type 2 Diabetis a metabolic illness. With Type 2 Diabetes, the body doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin isn’t being used properly in the body. Johns Hopkins Medicine: Health Library writes that over 23 million people in the United States have Type 2 Diabetes. The illness can cause nerve damage (neuropathy), kidney damage, eye damage and many other life threatening complications.

 

What can you do to reduce your sugar intake?
Sugar has many dangerous consequences. It’s important to understand the risks associated with the consumption of sugar and make positive lifestyle changes to reduce the chances of acquiring a metabolic illness. The Caribbean Food and Nutrition Institute provides tips for reducing excess sugar intake in the following:-Read food labels and choose less sweet alternatives.

  • Reduce the amount of sugar added to drinks, porridges, cakes, puddings, desserts, etc…
  • Spice up dishes with ginger, pimento, cinnamon, vanilla, nutmeg, cloves and other spices.
  • Use more fruits and less sugar in cakes. Dried fruits such as raisins and prunes give a sweet “bite”.
  • Use dried or fresh fruits in cereals and porridges e.g, raisins or ripe banana
  • Don’t over-do your intake of sweet fruit juices. Use smaller amounts and dilute the water or vegetable juice.

 

Sources:
World Health Organization
University of California, San Francisco
Johns Hopkins Medicine: Health Library
Caribbean Food and Nutrition Institute 

 

 

 

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Hang Pham, MBHA Health EducatorThis article is written by Hang Pham. Hang Pham is a Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance Health and Wellness Educator. Hang Pham was born in Hoc Mon, Vietnam. She came to America in 1994, becoming a U.S. citizen in 2011. Hang graduated from Seaside High School with diploma and received her AA in General Studies from Monterey Peninsula College in 2011. She received her BA in Collaborative Health and Human Services from California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB) in 2012. In addition to working as a volunteer staff with the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance, she currently works as a Clerical Aid in the Human Resources Department of Salinas City Hall. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website atwww.montereybayholistic.com.


Disclaimer:  
The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

 

 

Top 30 Yoga Benefits

What are the benefits of yoga? How does the daily discipline of yoga affect the body, mind and spirit?

Yoga Benefits

30 Yoga Benefits

What is the History of Yoga?
Yoga is a holistic health and wellness activity that both relaxes and energizes the body. Yoga is a Sanskrit word meaning “union with God.” The common belief that Yoga derives from Hinduism is a misconception. Yoga actually predates Hinduism by many centuries. Ancient archeological finds discovered the Indus Valley provided unquestionable evidence that Yoga was practiced earlier than 3,000 B.C.E. and the classical techniques of Yoga may date back  to more than 5,000 years. The word Yoga means “to join or yoke together,” and it brings the body and mind together in harmony with one another. The whole system of Yoga is built on three main structures: exercise, breathing, and meditation. One of the earliest texts on Yoga  is believed to have been compiled by a scholar named Patanjali. This book contains Yoga theories and practices and is entitled Yoga Sutras (“Yoga Aphorisms”) and is thought to have been written as early as the 1st or 2nd century B.C. or as late as the 5th century A.D. This system is known as “Ashtanga Yoga.”  This is the eight limbs of Yoga, and referred to today as Classical Yoga. Most all forms of yoga include a variation of Patanjali’s original ancient yoga system.

 

What are the Different Types of Yoga?
There are over a hundred different schools of Yoga. There are many Yoga poses or postures within each of the different schools of Yoga.

Yoga PosesSome of the most well known schools of Yoga are as follows:

  1. Hatha Yoga  Hatha Yoga  is the most widely practiced form of yoga in the United States. It is the branch of yoga which concentrates on physical health and mental well-being using exercises and breathing control.  “Ha” can be translated to mean “sun” and “tha” to mean “moon” meaning to balance the opposite forces.
  2. Raja Yoga – Raja Yoga means the “King” of Yoga, or the royal path. It is a form of Hindu yoga intended to achieve control over the mind and emotions.
  3. Jnana Yoga – Jñāna yoga or “path of knowledge” is one of the types of yoga mentioned in Hindu philosophies. Jñāna is a Sanskrit word translated to mean “knowledge”.
  4. Bhakti Yoga  – Bhakti yoga is a spiritual path described in Hindu philosophy as focused on love of, faith in, and surrender to God. It is a means to awaken to God consciousness. It is a selfless devotion of reaching Brahman (God) in loving service.
  5. Karma Yoga – Karma Yoga is selfless action to reach perfection. “Karma” is a Sanskrit term meaning “action” or deed, either physical or mental. What makes a Karma Yogi is first the experience of union with God, and then selfless action.
  6. Tantra Yoga – Tantra yoga is a type of yoga designed to awaken the kundalini energy in the body and addressing relationships and sexuality. In Hinduism, the word Tantra means: 1) weaving and 2) the sacred scriptures of Hinduism, presented as a dialogue between Shiva and Shakti
  7. Kashmir Shaivism Yoga – Kashmir Shaivism is a transformative non-dual, yogic philosophy that originated in Kashmir in the ninth century. The goal of Kashmir Shaivism is to merge in Shiva or Universal Consciousness, or realize one’s already existing identity with Shiva, by means of wisdom, yoga and grace.

yoga older manWhat Does Research Tell Us About the Effectiveness of Yoga?
Sudarshan Kriya Yoga was concluded to be a potentially effective treatment in reducing or eliminating depression in a study by Janakiramaiah N and others (2000) and a review of clinical studies of the effectiveness of Hatha Yoga on depression by Uebelacker et al  (2010).

The prac­tice of yoga has been shown to be therapeutically useful in bron­chial asthmaNagarathna R, Nagendra HR (1985) concluded that “There was a significantly greater improvement in the group who practised yoga in the weekly number of attacks of asthma, scores for drug treatment, and peak flow rate.”  However, a 2011 systematic review of clinical studies suggests that there is no sound evidence that yoga improves asthma.

back pain personMultiple studies  have found yoga to be a helpful treatment in low back pain such as Sherman KJ, Cherkin DC, Wellman RD, et al (2011) and Tilbrook HE, Cox H, Hewitt CE, et al. (2011).   Other studies have shown yoga to be potentially helpful treatment for cardiovascular disease, such as Raub (2002), type II diabetes mellitus (Innes and Vincent, 2007),  stress and hypertension (Kiecolt-Glaser JK, and others, 2010) as well as other conditions. The practice of yoga can also play a role in the rehabilitation of those who have physical and mental challenges (Uma, et al, 2008).  Many other benefits are inherit in the practice of yoga as described below.

What Are the 30 Benefits of Yoga?

  1. Relieves Stress
  2. Improves Breathing
  3. Eases Pain
  4. Improves Circulation
  5. Increases Strength
  6. Increases Endurance
  7. Lowers Heart Rate
  8. Develops Inner Peace
  9. Lengthens Muscles
  10. Increases Flexibilityyoga mats
  11. Reduces Cortisol Level
  12. Improves Concentration
  13. Increases Range of Motion
  14. Dissolves Ego
  15. Develops Compassion
  16. Enhances Energy
  17. Heals Ailments
  18. Fosters Joy
  19. Lowers Weight
  20. Lubricates Joints
  21. Detoxes the Body
    yoga man
  22. Strengthens Abdomen
  23. Improves Memory
  24. Delays Wrinkles and Aging
  25. Burns Fat
  26. Improves Posture
  27. Improves Metabolism
  28. Builds Immune System
  29. Improves Balance
  30. Brings Harmony

Have you tried yoga? If so, how has it helped YOU?  Best wishes for a yoga-riffic day!!

 _______________________________

References
Bower JE, Woolery A, Sternlieb B, et al. Yoga for cancer patients and survivors. Cancer Control. 2005;12(3):165–171.

Innes, KE, Vincent HK, The Influence of Yoga-Based Programs on Risk Profiles in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review, Evid Based Complement Alternat Med., Dec 2007; 4(4): 469–486.
Jain SC, Talukdar B. Bronchial asthma and Yoga. Singapore Med J 1993;34:306-308

Janakiramaiah N. , Gangadhar B.N. , Naga Venkatesha Murthy P.J. , Harish M.G., Subbakrishna, D.K., Vedamurthachar A.  Antidepressant efficacy of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY) in melancholia: a randomized comparison with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and imipramine Volume 57, Issue 1 , Pages 255-259, January 2000

Kiecolt-Glaser JK, Christian L, Preston H, et al. Stress, inflammation, and yoga practice. Psychosomatic Medicine. 2010;72(2):113–121.

Monro R, Power J, Coumar A, Nagarathna R, Dandona P. Original research yoga therapy for NIDDM; A controlled trial. Complem Med J 1992;6:66-68.

Nagarathna R, Nagendra HR. Yoga for bronchial asthma; A controlled study. Br Med J 1985;291:1077-1079.

Ramesh L. Bijlani, Rama P. Vempati, Raj K. Yadav, Rooma Basu Ray, Vani Gupta, Ratna Sharma, Nalin Mehta, and Sushil C. Mahapatra.  A Brief but Comprehensive Lifestyle Education Program Based on Yoga Reduces Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Mellitus The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. April 2005, 11(2): 267-274. doi:10.1089/acm.2005.11.267.

Raub, JA. Psychophysiologic effects of hatha yoga on musculoskeletal and cardiopulmonary function: a literature review. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 2002;8(6):797–812.

Sherman KJ, Cherkin DC, Wellman RD, et al. A randomized trial comparing yoga, stretching, and a self-care book for chronic low back pain. Archives of Internal Medicine. 2011;171(22):2019–2026.

Telles S, Naveen K V. Yoga for rehabilitation : An overview, Vivekananda Kendra Yoga Research Foundation, No. 19, K.G. Nagar, Bangalore-560 019., India,  Indian J Med Sci 1997;51:123-7Monro R, Power J, Coumar A, Nagarathna R, Dandona P. Original research yoga therapy for NIDDM; A controlled trial. Complem Med J 1992;6:66-68.

Tilbrook HE, Cox H, Hewitt CE, et al. Yoga for chronic low back pain: a randomized trial. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2011;155(9):569–578.

Uebelacker LA, Epstein-Lubow G, Gaudiano BA, et al. Hatha yoga for depression: a critical review of the evidence for efficacy, plausible mechanisms of action, and directions for future research. Journal of Psychiatric Practice. 2010; 16(1):22–33.

Uma K, Nagendra HR, Nagarathna R., Vaidehi S, and Seethalakshmi R., The integrated approach of yoga: a therapeutic tool for mentally retarded children: a one-year controlled study, Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, Vol 33, Issue 5, 28 JUN 2008, DOI: 10.1111/ j.1365-2788.1989.tb01496


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Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice Dart, M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University. Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.” She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.

Disclaimer:
The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

Diabetes and Cancer: Is There a Connection?

 

What are Diabetes Symptoms?

What are Diabetes Symptoms?

What are the  Common Symptoms of Diabetes and Cancer?

The most common symptoms of diabetes are fatigue, excessive thirst and appetite, blurred vision, slow healing sores, dry mouth, unusual weight loss or weight gain, nausea and perhaps vomiting, yeast infections, itching in the groin or vagina and increased urination.  Both cancer and diabetes share symptoms of obesity, lack of physical activity, hyperinsulinemia, inflammation and poor diet. 

Cancer and Diabetes


Is There a Connection Between Diabetes and Cancer?
Diabetes and cancer both share the same risk factors. Researchers are trying to learn more about the link between type 2 diabetes and certain cancers (liver, pancreas, uterus, breast, colon and bladder).  Common risk factors for diabetes and cancer  include: 1) age, 2) gender, 3) race/ethnicity, 4) overweight, 5) smoking, 6) alcohol, 7) inactivity.


Cancer Diabetes Chart


Could the Connection be Caused by the Diabetes Medication?

It is possible that the connection between cancer and diabetes is due to the diabetes medication, however more evidence is needed. Research shows that the implication of  a cancer link to the medication is “less persuasive”  however, it is important that research be conducted to rule out this as a contributing factor.  In a consensus Statement by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Endocrinology, entitled, “Diabetes and Cancer – An AAE/ACE Consensus Statement,”  Handelsman, Y., LeRoith, D., Bloomgarden, Z., and others concluded:

 

Diabetes Medication
“Epidemiology demonstrated a significant increase of cancer in obesity, insulin-resistant states (i.e., metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome), and ultimately diabetes.

Basic science has suggested plausible mechanisms linking these conditions to the development of cancer. Although medications to treat the hyperglycemia of diabetes have been implicated in increasing the risk of cancer, the totality of evidence is less persuasive, and there is a need for current vigilance and future research.”

 

Cancer and Diabetes Risks

Is There a Connecting Link with Obesity, Diabetes and Cancer?
Yes. The American Association of Cinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Endocrinology stated in there consensus statement, “Diabetes and Cancer,” that it is most likely that obesity is the strongest link between cancer and diabetes.  Research shows that reducing caloric intake lowers the risk of cancer, and therefore, obesity in diabetics can increase the cancer risk.   Handelsman, Y., LeRoith, D., Bloomgarden, Z., and others stated:

“After examining the relative contributions of obesity, insulin, IGF’s and diabetes to cancer development, it would appear that the most compelling scenario for cancer development may include a combination of prolonged obesity due to excess caloric intake plus the resulting increase of circulating insulin, IGF’s cytokines and inflammatory molecules. Compelling research in animals has shown that caloric restriction (>10 to 40% of daily intake) can prevent cancer development with diminished levels of IGF-1 believed to play a central role in mediating this effect.”


Diabetes and CancerWhat to Do to Reduce Risk of Diabetes or Cancer

  • Eat Healthy Foods – The recommended diet for cancer prevention and diabetes prevention and maintenance is the same. A diabetes diet — medically known as medical nutrition therapy (MNT) for diabetes, is basically a diet consisting of a variety of nutritious foods in moderate amounts and eaten at regular mealtimes.
  • Keep Weight Down – Studies show that increased weight gain and obesity lead to problems with diabetics and increased risk of cancer. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers health benefits.According to the American Cancer Society, one out of every three cancer deaths in the United States is linked to excess body weight, poor nutrition, and/or physical inactivity. Body weight appears to have the strongest evidence linking it to cancer. The American Cancer Society  reports that obesity contributes to as many as 1 out of 5 of all cancer-related deaths.

Type 2 Diabetes

  • Exercise and Keep Active –  Exercise several times a day. If you have a sedentary job (one that keeps you sitting for most of the day), take breaks every two hours and do light stretching exercises). Research confirms that inactivity leads to diabetes and cancer.

    The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) is a nationally representative survey of the U.S. population. From 2000 to 2002, detailed social, demographic, and medical information was collected for 68,500 adults. The researchers concluded that “both physical inactivity and obesity seem to be strongly and independently associated with diabetes and diabetes-related diseases cormorbidities.”  Scientists have shown that low levels of physical activity can increase the risk of certain cancers (bowel cancer, breast cancer, womb cancer, and others). A December 2011 study estimated that in about 1% of cancers in the United Kingdom, more than 3,000 cases every year are linked to people doing less than government suggested guidelines for weekly physical exercises and activities.

  • Do not smoke cigarettes or other carcinogenic materials.  If you are already smoking, stop. If you haven’t started smoking, don’t begin.  Multiple studies confirm the increased risk of cancer in those who smoke.  However, is the same risk true for diabetes? Research confirms that smoking can cause the development of Type 2 diabetes. According to  research from the American Heart Association, about 22% of adults with diabetes smoke, even though U.S. research indicates that the most harmful effect of smoking is linked to a significantly higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.The University of Lausanne in Switzerland, studied more than one million patients and found that smoking creates a 44% higher chance of developing Type 2 diabetes compared with non-smokers, and that the risk increases with the average number of cigarettes smoked daily.

Studies show that diabetes and cancer share the same risk factors. More research is needed to determine if there is a link between the two.

RESOURCES

_________________________________  

Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice Dart,  M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University.  Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.”  She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance.  The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3  nonprofit health and wellness education organization.  For more information about  the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.

Disclaimer:  The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

 

What are Symptoms of Diabetes?

Diabetes StatisticsWhat are the most common symptoms of diabetes?  How do you  know if you have diabetes? What should a person do to prevent diabetes?

Diabetes is usually a lifelong (chronic) disease in which there are high levels of sugar in the blood. According to recent statistics from the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, diabetes affects 25.8 million people of all ages. This is 8.3 percent of the U.S. population. It is estimated that about 18.8 million people are currently diagnosed with diabetes and that there are approximately 7.0 million people undiagnosed with diabetes.

What are the Two Types of Diabetes? 
There are two types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. In general, people with diabetes either have a total lack of insulin (type 1 diabetes) or they don’t have enough insulin or cannot use insulin adequately (type 2 diabetes).

Type 1 diabetes was originally named juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent diabetes, because it most frequently occurs in childhood. This type accounts for 5 to 10 out of 100 people who have diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, eventually eliminating insulin production from the body. Without insulin, cells cannot absorb sugar (glucose), which they need to produce energy.  Type 1 diabetes is rare, however, symptoms in type 1 diabetes usually present much more suddenly and are often severe, so people are more inclined to get to the doctor and get an accurate diagnosis.

Type 2 diabetes can begin at any age. It was previously referred to as adult-onset or non–insulin-dependent diabetes, and is commonly discovered during adulthood. However, type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed in childhood. About 90-95% of the people diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, the body has “insulin resistance” and is not able to immediately use insulin. As type 2 diabetes  worsens, the pancreas may make less and less insulin, resulting in insulin deficiency.  People with type 2 diabetes often don’t have any noticeable symptoms. Because of this, when symptoms do occur, people often do not go to a doctor or primary care provider, and type 2 diabetes is left undiagnosed or misdiagnosed.

Diabetes Stomach

How Does Diabetes Affect the Stomach, Pancreas and Bloodstream?
If a person has diabetes, the stomach changes food into glucose and glucose enters the bloodstream.  It travels through the blood vessel  to the pancreas.  The pancreas does not make enough insulin.  Little or no insulin enters the bloodstream from the pancreas.

When the glucose builds up in the bloodstream, it creates high levels of sugar in the blood.  This may result in noticeable symptoms or may go unnoticed for several years. The early detection and treatment of diabetes can decrease the risk of developing the complications of diabetes.

What are Diabetes Symptoms?

What are Diabetes Symptoms?

What are the Symptoms of Diabetes?
Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes include:

  1. Fatigue
  2. Excessive thirst and appetite
  3. Blurred vision
  4. Slow healing sores
  5. Dry mouth
  6. Unusual weight loss or weight gain
  7. Nausea and perhaps vomiting
  8. Itching in the groin or vagina
  9. Yeast infections (in both men and women)
  10. Increased urination
  11. Fainting spells
  12. High blood pressure
  13. Tingling, pain or numbness in hands or feet
  14. Rapid breathing
  15. Rapid heart beat

 


Diabetes sores
Are  Childhood Diabetes 
Symptoms Unique? 
Childhood diabetes can be very serious and is often difficult to detect. If you notice your child having any of the symptoms below, have him/her examined by a doctor as soon as possible.

  1. Frequent diaper rash
  2. Frequent illness
  3. Bed wetting
  4. Slow growth
  5. Behavior problems
  6. Unusual thirst
  7. Unusual hunger
  8. Slow healing sores


How is Diabete
s Treated?
Type 1 DiabetesType 1 diabetes is treated with insulin, exercise, and a diabetic diet.

Type 2 diabetes is treated first with weight reduction, a diabetic diet, and exercise. If these treatments do not control the elevation of blood sugars, then the doctor will most likely prescribe oral medications If oral medications are still insufficient, treatment with insulin is considered.

Elevated blood sugar from diabetes requires strict diet and lifestyle changes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has provided guidelines for a diabetic diet. The ADA diet is a balanced, nutritious diet, low in fat, cholesterol, and sugars.

If you suspect that you or a loved one might have diabetes,  contact your trusted doctor immediately.

  

Resources
Mayo ClinicWeb MD, American Diabetes AssociationNational Diabetes Information Clearinghouse


Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice  Dart,  M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University.  Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.”  She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance.  The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3  nonprofit health and wellness education organization.  For more information about  the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.


Disclaimer: The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

Does Exercise Help Nerve Pain?

Exercise Stops Pain

Research shows that daily light exercise can eliminate neuropathic pain.

WHAT IS NEUROPATHIC PAIN?
Nerve pain can be extremely uncomfortable and even fatal.  There are different types of nerve pain and neuropathy. Neuropathy can effect the internal organs or the extremities and joints.. Peripheral neuropathy can result from problems such as:

  1. traumatic injuries
  2. HIV
  3. infections
  4. metabolic problems
  5. exposure to toxins
  6. heredity
  7. medication side effects.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF NERVE PAIN?
Symptoms of nerve pain or neuropathic pain include tingling and numbness extremities. Many patients report sharp shooting pain, or a burning, throbbing and aching feeling. The loss of sensation is described as the feeling of wearing a thin stocking or glove. These sensations are caused by nerve damage to the brain and spinal cord throughout the rest of the body. Diabetic neuropathy is a category of  nerve disorders for people with diabetes.  Some of the more common conditions which may be associated with diabetic neuropathy include:Spinal Nerve

  1. third nerve palsy
  2. mononeuropathy
  3. mononeuropathy multiplex
  4. diabetic amyotrophy
  5. a painful polyneuropathy
  6. autonomic neuropathy
  7. thoracoabdominal neuropathy.

According to the Mayo Clinic definition of neuropathy,

Peripheral neuropathy, a result of nerve damage, often causes numbness and pain in your hands and feet. Autonomic neuropathy is a nerve disorder that affects involuntary body functions, including heart rate, blood pressure, perspiration and digestion. It isn’t a disease. Autonomic neuropathy refers to damage to the autonomic nerves.

“Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal.”

 

WHAT IS THE LATEST RESEARCH?
The most exciting recent research is that of Dr. Yu-Wen Chen, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, China Medical University.   Dr. Yu-Wen Chen is the lead researcher, along with other colleagues, who studied the effects of exercise on neuropathic pain.  The most recent study focused on the protein known as Hsp72, known to protect cells from a variety of stresses.  The study, appearing in the February 2013 issue of Anesthesia & Analgesiaused rats, divided into four groups: normal sedentary rats, normal rats with exercise, sedentary diabetic rats and diabetic rats with exercise. Diabetes was chemically induced into the control group diabetic rats.

Diabetic Neuropathy

Nerves and Blood Vessels Damaged By Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN)

After two weeks, the diabetic sedentary rats exhibited signs of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). They demonstrated abnormal responses to temperature and pressure, both of which are indications of neuropathic pain. However, the diabetic rats that had exercise showed delayed progress of tactile and thermal hypersensitivity.  According to the results, the study showed that exercise significantly effected body weight loss and diabetes-induced blood glucose levels and body weight loss.   Says Dr.Yu-Wen Chen and the other authors of the study,

“These results suggest that progressive exercise training markedly decreases diabetes-associated neuropathic pain, including thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. In rats, this protective effect is related to the increase of Hsp72.”

This study was similar to another study also conducted by Dr. Yu-Wen Chen and others last year, which concluded significant reductions in neuropathic pain in rats assigned to swimming or treadmill running.

Cancer Exercise Treadmill
Dr Chen and colleagues examined the effects of exercise on neuropathic pain induced by sciatic nerve injury in rats. After nerve injury, some rats performed progressive exercise — either swimming or treadmill running — over a few weeks, and the researchers recorded observable pain. The researchers concluded that significant reductions were found in neuropathic paor treadmill running. Exercise reduced abnormal responses to temperature and pressure — both characteristic of neuropathic pain. Exercise also led to reduced inflammation-promoting cytokines in sciatic nerve tissue — specifically, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1-beta.  In the experiments, exercise reduced abnormal pain responses by 30 to 50 percent

WHAT EXERCISE IS RECOMMENDED FOR NEUROPATHIC PAIN?
Currently doctors agree that low-impact exercise for about 20 minutes a day, is often best for chronic nerve pain because it is much less strenuous on joints and feet.  This would include:

swim therapy osteoporosis

  1. walking
  2. water aerobics
  3. recumbent stationary bike
  4. elliptical trainer.

Less intensive exercises improve: blood circulation, and increase movement and heart rate, three things which can lesson the symptoms of neuropathic pain. Muscle damage can be a result of excessive exercise and can be especially painful for someone who already suffers from nerve pain.  It’s always best to check with your trusted physician or health care provider before beginning a new exercise routine.

 

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This article is written by Jean Voice Dart, M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University. Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.” She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at  www.montereybayholistic.com.

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