Constipation: Natural Solutions to Healthy Elimination

stomach-pain-doctorAre you spending a long time in the bathroom waiting for relief? Do you suffer from abdominal pain, cramping, constipation, and difficulty emptying your bowels? You may have chronic constipation and need to look at changing your life. Find out what causes constipation and what you can do to prevent it or treat it immediately and naturally.  Continue reading

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15 Arthritis Supplements and Alternative Approaches – Do They Work?

massage-handMillions of dollars are spent every year on prescriptions help relieve pain and stiffness associated with arthritis. Are there more natural supplements or alternative treatments that can be equally as effective? Do these natural approaches actually help in alleviating symptoms and is it worth the cost or effort? Continue reading

More Than Just Healthy Skin – Amazing Beneficial Effects of a Facial

facialWhat are the benefits of a facial? Is it more than just a “get away” from the stress, worry, and drudgery of work or family? Are you looking for a life changer? Read this article to discover real benefits of the facial that go beyond healthy skin. Continue reading

Holistic Veterinary Medicine – What is It? What Can I Expect?

Guinea PigWhat is Holistic Veterinary Medicine?   Many American families have at least one pet in their household. The most common types of domesticated animals are dogs, cats, fishes, birds, rabbits, and mice. What is holistic veterinary medicine? What do holistic veterinarians treat? How effective is natural treatment? Do some veterinarians use both orthodox and complimentary medicine? Continue reading

20 Alternative Approaches to Stress

Causes of StressWhat causes stress and how can we prevent it? Are there effective alternative, holistic, and complementary practices to treating stress besides prescription drugs?


What Does Current Research Say About Treatment for Stress?
Current studies show that Americans are not satisfied with healthcare programs addressing stress.

Stress statisticsA recent study entitled, “Stress in America™: Missing the Health Care Connection,”  was conducted online by Harris Interactive on behalf of the American Psychological Association, among 2,020 U.S. adults in August of 2012.   The results of the study suggest that people are not receiving what they need from their health care providers to effectively manage stress and help them with necessary lifestyle and behavior changes needed to improve their health.

Stress in America

Stress in America – 42% reported that the leading stress symptom they experienced was anger or irritability.

A little more than half (53%) of Americans said they receive little or no support for stress management from their providers.  Thirty-nine percent (39%) said that they have little or no behavior management support.  Thirty-five percent (35%) of Americans said that their stress increased this past year.

Stress effects on body

The effects of stress on the body

What are Stress Symptoms?
Stress symptoms can be emotional, physical, behavioral and mental or psychological.  A person under stress might have the following symptoms:

  • easily irritated
  • frustrated
  • mood swings
  • hopeless
  • not able to relax
  • low self-esteem
  • paranoia
  • trouble focusing
  • lonely
  • avoiding people and projects
  • headache
  • upset stomach
  • diarrhea
  • constipation
  • muscle pain
  • fatigue
  • sleepiness
  • insomnia
  • sweating
  • chills

    Stress Symptom Nail Biting

  • biting nails
  • grinding teeth
  • frightened
  • panic attack
  • trouble swallowing
  • cold or flu symptoms
  • shaking or shivering
  • pacing
  • drug use
  • negativity (criticism or gossip)


How is Stress Diagnosed and Treated?
There is no specific medical test for stress but your trusted healthcare provider or family physician should do a thorough medical and psychological exam and evaluation.  He or she will ask you about your family history, your work, your daily routine, and personal life to help determine “stress triggers”  and discuss a plan of treatment. It might be helpful for you to keep a stress diary for a few weeks to determine causes of stress.

EEG TestThe doctor might also order blood and urine lab tests, EEG, EMG, MRI, or other tests to rule out other illnesses that might be triggering stress symptoms. Basic tests will include measuring your blood pressure and completing a questionnaire to test for depression. After making diagnostic or psychological tests have been completed, your trusted healthcare practitioner may recommend treatment.

Treatment may include lifestyle changes such as changes in diet, physical activity or exercise, meditation, or prescription medications. If you don’t feel comfortable with the doctor’s evaluation or plan of treatment, it is important that you trust yourself and your own body wisdom when making a decision.  Make sure that you are working with a doctor as a member on your team, and that your healthcare professionals are working closely with you.

Which Types of Alternative Approaches Have Been Effective?

Alternative Stress Treatment

What holistic, alternative approaches are effective in treating stress?

There are many types of alternative approaches that have been shown to be effective in relieving stress, however, most approaches take time and training for the person to be skilled enough to use it successfully, or for the hands-on practitioner to be successful in working cooperatively with the client to achieve success.

Research studies show that alternative approaches can ]reduce or eliminate stress symptoms. Exercise has been well-documented as a stress-reducer, as has prayer, deep breathing, and meditation. Hypnosis and massage are also highly effective alternative treatments to prescription drugs.

Massage

Therapeutic massage is a well-documented  alternative treatment for alleviating stress.

Some of the natural approaches to relieving stress are:

  • Massage
  • Yoga
  • Tai Chi
  • Qigong
  • Deep Breathing
  • Biofeedback
  • Meditation
  • Prayer
  • Music therapy
  • Art therapy
  • Dance therapy
  • Drama therapy
  • Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT)
  • Flower Essences
  • Essential Oils
  • Homeopathic remedies
  • Light therapy
  • Crystals or gemstones
  • Guided imagery or visualization

    Acupuncture

    Acupuncture can be a successful alternative treatment to reducing stress related symptoms

  • Acupuncture
  • Self-hypnosis
  • Psychic healing
  • Energetic healing/Reiki
  • Counseling or Psychiatric
  • Physical therapy
  • Physical Exercise
  • Sex
  • Chiropractic

For more information about which alternative or complimentary therapies or approaches are best for your needs in treating anxiety or stress, consult with your trusted health-care practitioner, or check out the resources below.

Resources
The American Institute on Stress
The Stress Resource Center – Harvard
Healthfinder.gov – Stress Management
Holistic Stress Management for Nurses
American Psychological Association
Huffington Post -Reduce Stress Now
Mayo Clinic – Stress Management

Research
Keil, R.M.K. (2004) Coping and stress: a conceptual analysis Journal of Advanced Nursing, 45(6), 659–665


Viner, R. (1999) Putting Stress in Life: Hans Selye and the Making of Stress Theory. Social Studies of Science, Vol. 29, No. 3 (June 1999), pp. 391–410

O’Connor, T. M.; O’Halloran, D. J.; Shanahan, F. (2000). “The stress response and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis: From molecule to melancholia”. QJM : monthly journal of the Association of Physicians 93 (6): 323–333.

LE Walker Post-traumatic stress disorder in women: Diagnosis and treatment of battered woman syndrome.
– Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 1991

Hayes, Steven C.; Wilson, Kelly G.; Gifford, Elizabeth V.; Follette, Victoria M.; Strosahl, Kirk. Experiential avoidance and behavioral disorders: A functional dimensional approach to diagnosis and treatment. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol 64(6), Dec 1996, 1152-1168. doi: 10.1037/0022-006X.64.6.1152, Special Section: Development of Theoretically Coherent Alternatives to the DSM-IV.

_______________________________________


Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice Dart,  M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University.
 Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.”  She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance.  The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3  nonprofit health and wellness education organization.  For more information about  the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.

 Disclaimer:The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

What is Ayurvedic Medicine?

Alternative Medicine

What is Ayurvedic Medicine? Ayurvedic medicine is a complementary alternative medicine system (CAM).  It incorporates other alternative therapies such as massage, exercise, and herbal remedies. Click, copy, download and save and share.

Hello, health friends. Hej, folk, der elsker sundhed.

WHAT IS AYURVEDIC? 
Ayurvedic medicine is said to have originated in India more than 5,000 years ago and has evolved the years. Ayurveda is one of the world’s oldest medical practices.  In the United States, Ayurvedic medicine is considered a CAM (complementary and alternative medicine) whole medical system.

Ayurveda means “the science of life,” originating from the Sanskrit words ayur (life) and veda (science or knowledge).   Many therapies used in Ayurvedic medicine are also used separately as a complete complementary medical system, such as massage, herbal remedies, and a special diet.   It integrates mind, body and spirit.  According to a recent National Health Interview Survey, more than 200,000 U.S. adults had used Ayurvedic medicine in the past year.

WHAT IS THE AYURVEDIC BELIEF?
Ayurvedic medicine is based on three basic concepts: 1) interconnectedness, 2) prakriti and 3) doshas.

Ayurvedic practitioners believe in interconnectedness — that all things are connected in the universe and disease occurs when we are out of balance with one or more things in the universe and/or within ourselves. When we are in harmony with mind, body and spirit and in harmony with others and the universe, then we are healthy.

Prakriti is one’s constitution, or one’s general health and ability to heal and recover. According to Ayurveda, prakriti is something that is unchangeable and the underlying condition that one is born with and is a combination of physical and psychological characteristics that affect the bodily functions.

Doshas are known by their original Sanskrit names: vata, pitta, and kapha.  Each dosha is composed of five elements: air, water, fire, earth, and space.   1) Vata – ether and air,  2) Pitta – fire and water 3) Kapha – earth and space.

WHAT HAPPENS IN AN AYURVEDIC SESSION?
An ayurvedic practitioner asks a person about diet, lifestyle, history of illnesses, checking urine, bowel movement, speech, pulse, tongue, skin, eyes, weight, overall appearance.  The treatment involves a change in diet, herbal supplements, massage, exercises including breathing techniques and meditation.  Some concerns have been presented over typically presribed herbs, metals, minerals or materials that can be toxic to the body. Caution should be taken when ingesting herbal remedies.   In 2004,  NCCAM (the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine) published research findings stating that of 70 Ayurvedic remedies purchased over-the-counter, 14 contained lead, mercury, and/or arsenic at levels that could be harmful. All were manufactured in Southeast Asia.  Also in same year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that in a recent three-year period, 12 cases of lead poisoning were linked to the use of Ayurvedic medications.

Have you tried Ayurvedic Medicine?  How did it work for you?  Like and share with friends.

Best wishes from your health and wellness friends at MBHA.

NCCAM (National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine)
CDC (Centers for Disease Control)

What is Essential Oil and Aromatherapy?

What Are Essential Oils?
lavender oil
An essential oil is a concentrated liquid containing volatile aromatic compounds from a wide variety of plants, flowers, and herbs.  Essential oils are made from berries, roots, stems and leaves of plants.   There are more than 150 common essential oils that are used in a variety of ways, although many more oils exist.  The term “essential” refers to the “essence” of the plant.

 

Image credit: http://oilextech.com/

Image credit: http://oilextech.com/

Essential oils are generally created by distillation with steam, although other methods can be used to extract the oil.  Essential oils are used in aromatherapy for healing.  They are also used in perfumes, cosmetics, and cleaning products, and added to foods for flavoring.

HOW ARE ESSENTIAL OILS USED FOR HEALTH AND HEALING?
Essential oils are extensively used  in aromatherapy and in combination with other holistic health practices such as massage or energetic healing.   Essential oils have been found to have a wide variety of health benefits, and are currently being tested in laboratories by researchers for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases including:

  1. bronchitis
  2. heart disease
  3. cancer
  4. HIV
  5. asthma

How Do Essential Oils Enter the Body?
Essential oils enter the body in three ways:

  • They can be inhaled
  • They can be absorbed into the skin
  • They can be eaten.

Some oils oils are strong in nature and can cause side effects if they are not taken in the appropriate manner and quantities.   Some oils may cause allergic reactions.   A complete patient history should be taken before applying essential oils. Always consult a medical practitioner before using these oils, internally or topically.

essential oil massageApplying Oils to the Skin
Essential oils can be very effective when applied to the skin.  For example, an oil blend that contains black pepper (Piper nigrum) or ginger (Zinziber officinalis) essential oil can be applied to the skin to reduce arthritis pain and improve flexibility, or an oil that contains German Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) can be applied to treat eczema. Many of the citruses oils are phototoxic.  This means that particular compounds can become toxic when exposed to sunlight. This is not of concern when diffused or sprayed but when applied to the skin, it can be toxic.  It is suggested, then that the person using phototoxic oils, is not exposed to the sun for at least 24 hours after applying the oil.  Some oils need to be diluted, because they can be irritating when applied directly to the skin.  A skin patch test should be conducted prior to using an essential oil that has never been used before.

 

Inhaling Essential Oils

Inhaled essential oils can affect the body through several systems and pathways. The odor molecules travel through the nose and affect the limbic system, the emotional brain, often bringing relief and healing.  If you are pregnant, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any other medical problem, use essential oils only under the proper guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Use extreme caution when using oils with children and give children only the gentlest oils at extremely low doses. It is safest to consult a qualified aromatherapy practitioner before using essential oils with children. A skin patch test should be conducted prior to using an essential oil that you’ve never used before.
counselingIngesting Essential Oils
Oral ingestion of essential oils is NOT recommended except under the strict guidance of a aromatherapist, medical doctor or health practitioner because many essential oils can be toxic to the liver or kidneys and the chemical breakdown in the stomach can change the effects of the essential oils. For information about the healing properties of oils, contact an aromatherapist.   Essential oils should always be treated as medicine and should not be carelessly used or misused.

Herbal Essence DropperCommon Types of Essential Oils
Some popular essential oils include the following:

  • Agarwood oil
  • Ajwain oil
  • Amber oil
  • Ambrette seed
  • Amyris oil
  • Angelica root oil
    Anise Oil
  • Anise oil
  • Atlas Cedar
  • Balsam oil
  • Basil oil
  • Black Sage oil
  • Siam Benzoin Resinoid
  • Bergamot oil
  • Bitter Orange oil
  • Black Currant Bud Absolute
  • Black Currant Bud Concrete
  • Black Pepper oil
  • Boronia Absolute
  • Buchu oil
  • Calophyllum (Fatty Oil)
  • Cajeput oil
  • Camphor oil
  • Cannabis flower oil
  • Caraway oil
  • Cardamom Seed oil
  • Carrot Seed oil
  • Cedar oil
  • Cedar Wood oil
  • Cedar Leaf oil
  • Celery oil
  • chamomileChamomile oil
  • Roman Chamomile oil
  • German Chamomile oil
  • Calamus Root oil
  • Cinnamon oil
  • Citronella oil
  • Citrus oil
  • Clary Sage oil
  • Clove oil
  • Copla resin
  • Coffee oil
  • Coriander oil
  • Costmary oil
  • Costus Root Cranberry Seed oil
  • Cumin oil
  • Curry Leaf oil
  • Cypress oil
  • Davana oil
  • Dill oil
  • Eucalyptus oil
  • Eucalyptus Citriodora oil
  • Eucalyptus Dives oil
  • Eucalyptus Globulus oil
  • Eucalyptus Polybractea oil
  • Eucalyptus Radiata oil
  • Eucalyptus Smithi oil
  • Eucalyptus Essential OilEucalyptus Staigeriana oil
  • Everlasting oil
  • Fennel seed oil
  • Fenugreek oil
  • Fir Needle oil
  • Frankincense oil
  • Galbanum oil
  • Geranium oil
  • Ginger oil
  • Grapefruit oil
  • Green Myrtle oil
  • Greenland Moss oi
  • Henna oil
  • Helichrysum oil
  • Honeysuckle aboslute
  • Hyssop oil
  • Inula Graveolens oil
  • Jasmine oil
  • Juniper oil
  • Juniper berry oil
  • Khella oil
  • Laurel oil
  • Lavender oil
  • Lavandin oil
  • Lemon OilLemon oil
  • Lemon Verbena oil
  • Lemongrass oil
  • Lemon Myrtle oil
  • Lime oil
  • Litsea cubeba oil
  • Lotus oil
  • Mandarin oil
  • Mandarin Petitgrain oil
  • Marjoram oil
  • Mastic oil
  • May Chang oil
  • Melissa oil
  • Mentha Arvensis oil
  • Mint oil
  • Moroccan Chamomile oil
  • Moroccan Thyme oil
  • Mountain Sage oil
  • Mugwort oil
  • Mustard oil
  • Myrrh oil
  • Myrtle oil
  • Neroli oil
  • Niaouli
  • Nutmeg oil
    Orange Oil
  • Sweet Orange oil
  • Orange leaf oil
  • Oregano oil
  • Orris oil
  • Palmarosea oil
  • Parsley oil
  • Patchouli oil
  • Perilla Essential oil
  • Pennyroyal oil
  • Peppermint oil
  • Petitgrain oil
  • Pine oil
  • Pine Geranium oil
  • Ravensare oil
  • Red Cedar oil
  • Rose oil
  • Rosehip oil
  • Rosemary oil
  • Rosemary Camphor oil
  • Rosemary Cineoleoil
  • Rosemary Verbenone oil
  • Rosewood oil
  • Sage oil
  • Sandalwood oil
  • Sassafras oil
  • Savory oil
  • Schisandra oil
    Scotch Pine
  • Scotch Pine oil
  • Spearmint oil
  • Spike lavender oil
  • Spikenard oil
  • Spruce oil
  • Star anise oil
  • Tangerine oil
  • Tansy oil
  • Tarragon oil
  • Tea Tree oil
  • Thuja oil
  • Thyme oil
  • Thyme thymol oil
  • Thyme thujanol oil
  • Thyme linalol oil
  • Thyme geraniol oil
  • Tsuga oil
  • Tuberose Absolute
  • Turmeric oil
  • Valerian oil
  • Vanilla
  • Vetiver oil
  • Wintergreen oil
  • Wormwood oil
  • Yarrow oil
  • Ylang Ylang oil
  • Zedoary oil

References
Battaglia, S. The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy, by The International Centre of Aromatherapy, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Kilina AV, Kolesnikova MB.   The efficacy of the application of essential oils for the prevention of acute respiratory diseases in organized groups of children].  Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2011;(5):51-4. Russian. PMID: 22334926

Ross SM.  Aromatic plants, spirituality, and sacred traditions II. Holist Nurs Pract. 2010 Nov-Dec;24(6):355-7. doi: 10.1097/HNP.0b013e3181fbb8b3. No abstract available. PMID: 21037460

Tisserand , Robert,  and Blacas, Tony.  Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals.

Woronuk G, Demissie Z, Rheault M, Mahmoud S. Biosynthesis and therapeutic properties of Lavandula essential oil constituents.  Planta Med. 2011 Jan;77(1):7-15. doi: 10.1055/s-0030-1250136. Epub 2010 Jul 21. Review.  PMID: 20665367

_____________________________________

 

This article is written by Jean Voice Dart, M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University. Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.” She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance. The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3 nonprofit health and wellness education organization. For more information about the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website atwww.montereybayholistic.com.  Images used in this article are free public domain from Pixabay.com orPublicdomainpictures.net  Other images are credited.

 

Disclaimer: The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.

 

25 Healthy Holiday Gift Ideas

It’s that time of year when many people are scrambling for holiday gifts.  Most people give the typical clothing item, jewelry, toy, or electronic gadget.  Why not focus on “healthy gift giving” this year?  There are many options of the “health-minded” friend or family member. Here is our list of the top 25 best ideas for healthy holiday gift giving.

Healthy Holiday Gifts

Give a healthy gift this holiday season.

  1. massage certificate
  2. blender or juicer
  3. fruit basket
  4. charity donation
  5. concert tickets
  6. dancing lessons
  7. family outing or getaway
  8. swimming lessons
  9. exercise equipment
  10. camping equipment
  11. new glasses
  12. tree or outdoor plant
  13. meditation music CD’s
  14. manicure or pedicure certificate
  15. acupuncture certificate
  16. spa gift certificate
  17. herbal tea collection
  18. organic spice set
  19. gym membership or class
  20. supportive shoes
  21. foot massager machine
  22. dental cleaning appointment
  23. educational books
  24. air purifier
  25. professional house cleaner

25 Healthy Holiday GiftsWhat ideas do YOU have for healthy gift giving?

Best wishes to you and your family this holiday season from your heath and wellness friends at the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance!

Massage Therapy – Healing Hands

Massage Therapy

Our bodies communicate to us clearly and specifically, if we are willing to listen. ~Shakti Gawain

WHAT IS MASSAGE THERAPY?
What are the different types of massage therapy? How is it beneficial? Massage therapy is a very popular and effective therapeutic treatment. There are probably more than 100 types of massage therapy. Swedish massage is one of the most commonly practiced types of massage in the United States.

Massage therapists use several different techniques including long, smooth strokes, kneading and other movements to stimulate. increase circulation, soothe, or relax superficial layers of muscle. Sometimes massage oil or lotion is used.

Locations for MassageHOW POPULAR IS MASSAGE THERAPY? According to the most recent American Massage Therapy Association survey, roughly 38 million adult Americans (18 percent) had a therapeutic massage at least once a year. More than half of adult Americans (59 percent) would like to see their insurance cover massage therapy.

The average income for a massage therapist living in the United States is about $21,000 per year.  More than 50% of all massage therapists, earn a living doing another job, as well.  An average of 31 percent of adult Americans received a massage in the previous five years.

Massage TherapistWHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF MASSAGE THERAPY?
So why do people use massage therapy and what are the benefits?  Massage therapy can be beneficial in a number of different ways:

  • soothe achy joints
  • relieve depression
  • remove stress
  • lower blood pressure
  • reduce level of stress hormone cortisol
  • boost neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine
  • reduce inflammation
  • improve sleep
  • increase disease-fighting white blood cells
  • reduce PMS symptoms, like bloating and mood swings
  • increase mental alertness
  • increase blood flow to improve complexion and skin
  • encourage lymphatic drainage
  • bring relief to chronic illness sufferers

and more.

WHEN SHOULD YOU NOT USE MASSAGE THERAPY? 

Massage and Medications

Massage therapy is not for everyone. Particular medications can affect the impact of massage therapy manipulations, as outlined above. Massage therapy is not recommended in the following situations

  • If you have an infectious skin disease or rash, massage therapy should not be allowed.
  • If you have an open wound, do not allow massage therapy near the wound.
  • If you have a torn muscle, with swelling and bruising, you should check with your doctor and wait for the area to heal.
  • If you are prone to blood clots, check with your doctor.
  • If you have heart disease you should check with your doctor before having a massage.
  • If you have recently had chemotherapy or radiation, check with your doctor before having a massage.
  • If the area is inflamed, do not allow massage to be done directly on top of the area of inflammation.
  • If you have tumors, you should not have massage done directly on top of the tumors.
  • If you have abdominal hernia, do not massage the hernia.
  • If you have fractures or broken bones, do not masssage directly over the area.
  • If you are pregnant, massage therapists who are certified in pregnancy massage should be used, after checking with your doctor.
  • It’s best not to eat a full meal just prior to massage therapy.

WHAT ARE THE MOST POPULAR TYPES OF MASSAGE THERAPY?
There are probably more than one hundred different types of massage therapy available.  Here are a few of the more popular types of massage.

  1. Swedish Massage Therapy
    a. Effleurage
    b. Petrissage
    c. Friction
    d. Vibration
    e. Percussion
    f. Passive and active
  2. Thai Massage
  3. Aromatherapy Massage
  4. Deep Tissue Massage
  5. Shiatsu
  6. Pregnancy or Prenatal Massage
  7. Hot Stone Massage
  8. Reflexology
  9. Sports Massage
  10. Back Massage
  11. Trigger Point Therapy
  12. Cranial Sacral Therapy
  13. Geriatric Massage
  14. Chair Massage
  15. Neuromuscular Therapy Massage
  16. Active Release Technique Massage
  17. Bowen Technique
  18. Acupressure
  19. Hawaiian Lomi Lomi Massage
  20. Lymphatic Massage
  21. Ayurvedic Massage
  22. Raindrop Therapy Massage
  23. Polarity Therapy Massage
  24. Breast Massage
  25. Rolfing Massage
  26. Feldenkrais Massage
  27. Aquatic Massage

For more information about massage therapy, visit the following websites.

Resources
The American Massage Therapy Association 
The National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork (NCBTMB)
The National Association of Massage Therapists
The Massage Therapy Foundation

_______________________________________


Jean E. DartThis article is written by Jean Voice Dart,  M.S. Special Education from Illinois State University.
 Jean is a published author and has written hundreds of health articles as well as hosting a local television program, “Making Miracles Happen.”  She is a Registered Music Therapist, Sound Therapist, and Master Level Energetic Teacher, and is the Executive Director, founder and Health and Wellness Educator of the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance.  The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a registered 501 (c) 3  nonprofit health and wellness education organization.  For more information about  the Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance contact us or visit our website at www.montereybayholistic.com.

 Disclaimer:The Monterey Bay Holistic Alliance is a charitable, independent registered nonprofit 501(c)3 organization and does not endorse any particular products or practices. We exist as an educational organization dedicated to providing free access to health education resources, products and services. Claims and statements herein are for informational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The statements about organizations, practitioners, methods of treatment, and products listed on this website are not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This information is intended for educational purposes only. The MBHA strongly recommends that you seek out your trusted medical doctor or practitioner for diagnosis and treatment of any existing health condition.